Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Lack of complacency or gratification; envious displeasure; dislike.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Want of complacency or gratification; envious displeasure; dislike.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Dislike; dissatisfaction; displeasure.

Etymologies

Latin displacentia, for Latin displicentia, from displicere to displease; dis- + placere to please. See displease, and compare displeasance. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • In the divine nature there may be real, and yet most serene, complacency and displacency -- viz., that, unaccompanied by the least commotion, that impart nothing of imperfection, but perfection rather, as it is a perfection to apprehend things suitably to what in themselves they are.

    The World's Great Sermons, Volume 02 Hooker to South

  • And therefore temperate minds, not pressing their pleasures until the sting appeareth, enjoy their contentations contentedly, and without regret, and so escape the folly of excess, to be pleased unto displacency.

    Christian Morals

  • A displacency at the good of others because they enjoy it, though not unworthy of it, is an absurd depravity, sticking fast unto corrupted nature, and often too hard for humility and charity, the great suppressors of envy.

    Christian Morals

  • The difference is wide between displacency on our part in their extravagances, and an imputation of total abandonment.

    Documenting the American South: The Southern Experience in 19-th Century America

  • Christian nation feels not the slightest self-displacency for its allowing

    An Essay on the Evils of Popular Ignorance

  • A displacency at the good of others, because they enjoy it although we do not want it, is an absurd depravity sticking fast unto nature, from its primitive corruption, which he that can well subdue were a Christian of the first magnitude, and for ought I know may have one foot already in heaven.

    Religio Medici, Hydriotaphia, and the Letter to a Friend

  • And therefore temperate minds, not pressing their pleasures until the sting appeareth, enjoy their contentations contentedly and without regret, and so escape the folly of excess, to be pleased unto displacency. "

    A History of Elizabethan Literature

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.