Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A bedroom or dormitory, especially in a monastery.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A dormitory.

Etymologies

From Old French dortour (modern dortoir), from Latin dormitorium ("dormitory"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • “For a score of marks to the dortour,” said the Outlaw, — “Be still, I say, Isaac! — or for a brace of silver candlesticks to the altar, we will not stand with you.”

    Ivanhoe

  • Her answer was that the rape was committed in the dortour, where she durst not cry because it was a place of sempiternal silence.

    Five books of the lives, heroic deeds and sayings of Gargantua and his son Pantagruel

  • Capitane, who litill prevaling, was send unto thame Johne Knox; bot befoir his cuming, thay war entered to the pulling down of the ydollis and dortour.

    The Works of John Knox, Vol. 1 (of 6)

  • Then he brought him into the dortour, and asked him whereof he tempted the friars there, and he said: I make them sleep long and arise late, and thus I keep them from divine service, and in the meanwhile to have unclean thoughts.

    The Golden Legend, vol. 4

  • Then he appeared to her sister that night, that slept in the dortour, saying: I have healed thy sister; which anon arose and ran thither and found her whole.

    The Golden Legend, vol. 4

  • ` ` For a score of marks to the dortour, '' said the

    Ivanhoe

  • Yet, if the Israelite will advantage the Church by giving me somewhat over to the building of our dortour, *

    Ivanhoe

  • Alexander Halliburton Capitain, who little prevailing was sent unto them John Knox; but before his coming they were entered to the pulling down of the idols and dortour (dormitory).

    Royal Edinburgh Her Saints, Kings, Prophets and Poets

  • Denys then related, bursting with glee, how at bedtime he had been taken to a cell instead of the great dortour, and strictly forbidden to sleep; and to aid his vigil, a book had been lent him of pictures representing

    The Cloister and the Hearth

  • And when they were all in their beds, S. Nicholas appeared visibly and much fearfully to the prior, and drew him out by the hair, and smote him down on the pavement of the dortour, and began to sing the history: O pastor eterne; and at every note he smote him with a rod that he held in his hand right grievously on his back, and sang melodiously this anthem unto the end, and then the prior cried so loud that he awoke all his brethren, and was borne to his bed as halt dead, and when he came to himself, he said: Go ye and sing the new history of S. Nicholas from henceforth.

    The Golden Legend, vol. 7

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