Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. sweetness
  • n. seaweed, kelp
  • v. To make sweet; to soothe.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To make sweet; to soothe.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Sweet; pleasant; soothing.
  • n. Sweet wine; must. See the extract.
  • To make sweet; render pleasant; soothe.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Some may contend that Moon Pies are important as well but in my experience, most Mexican pan dulce is a variation of the dreaded Moon Pie so subtitute, pea brains, and drink horchata and eat the dreadful atole until you can no longer even look at a bowl of that inedible and disgusting porridge even a swine would pass up if given the choice.

    Page 4

  • You bring your TUPPER and buy a couple of liters of pozole, a dozen tamales, or a liter of atole to take home to drink with fresh pan dulce from the bakery.

    Hidden Restaurants - on the hunt

  • Of course, there is something known as dulce de leche common in much of Latin America -- but it isn't a cocktail.

    Guys and Dolls and Sweet Cuban Treats

  • Apparently Vendler fears that the aesthetic delight of literary texts (what Horace called dulce and what Matthew Arnold, echoing Swift, interpreted as "sweetness") has been hideously endangered by critics who seek to illuminate the moral or sociocultural significance of such texts (what Horace called utile and what Swift, then Arnold, interpreted as "light").

    Feminism and Literature: An Exchange

  • Of course, there is something known as dulce de leche

    WSJ.com: What's News US

  • One of your colleagues here at CNN, Candy Crowley, was Senora Dulce, which "dulce" meaning sweet or candy in Spanish.

    CNN Transcript Mar 10, 2002

  • FOOD AND FODDER: Names like "dulce" (sweet) and "Manila tamarind" reflect the wide use of the pods as food.

    Chapter 8

  • Names like "dulce" (sweet) and "Manila tamarind" reflect the wide use of the pods as food.

    Chapter 10

  • The generic name refers to the curly pod, that mimics an ape's earring (pithekos ellobium), and the species name "dulce" refers to the sweet pod.

    Chapter 10

  • They were strictly Mexican, from the unpalatable soup (Mexicans do not understand how to make good soup) to the "dulce" served at the close of the meal.

    Bohemian San Francisco Its restaurants and their most famous recipes—The elegant art of dining.

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Comments

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  • The root of Dulcinea.

    September 12, 2007

  • Spanish: sweet

    September 12, 2007