Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Of, related to, or being the verbal aspect that expresses action continuing unbroken for a period of time.
  • n. The durative aspect.
  • n. A durative verb or verb form.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of or pertaining to duration.
  • adj. long-lasting
  • adj. Of or pertaining to the aspect of a verb that expresses continuing action; continuative
  • n. This aspect, or a verb in this aspect; A continuative.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Continuing; not completed; implying duration.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • In philology, that expresses or serves to express continued or continuing action: as, to ‘sit’ and to ‘strike’ are durative verbs, while to ‘strike down’ and to ‘sit down’ are perfective verbs and express completed action.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the aspect of a verb that expresses its duration

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Ever notice that in the "rest of IE" there are some verbs that are "durative" or "present" and some that are "aorist" by default?

    Thoughts on the early Indo-European subjunctive 1ps ending

  • Returning Veteren casualties are expressing a lack of sufficent medical care and pressure to accept minimal buyouts -- instead of long-term care for durative injuries.

    Domestic Policy Issues, Arnold Kling | EconLog | Library of Economics and Liberty

  • The former leads to a durative-turned-present and the latter leads to a momentaneous-turned-past.

    New thought: A 2D matrix of eventive/non-eventive and subjective/objective

  • Yet, for all the careful reasoning and evidence behind this clever solution, Jasanoff's scheme seems to give us a curious overabundance of durative 'Narten stems' ie. verbs showing *ē/*e ablaut rather than *e/*∅.

    Where do Narten presents come from?

  • It appears that there's a symmetry between objective verbs marked with *-i ( durative, mi-class) and those unmarked by it ( aorist, past) on the one hand, and subjective verbs marked with *-r ( middle) and those without ( hi-class, perfect-stative) on the other.

    Interesting quirks of a PIE subjective-objective model

  • Jasanoff's theories, the durative-aorist-perfect model, active-stative, and subjective-objective into a single coherent model that explains everything much clearer than what I'm finding in journals and books.

    New thought: A 2D matrix of eventive/non-eventive and subjective/objective

  • Anyways, as per my previous model, there are interesting quirks that seem to automatically surface when I personally take on the goal to finally account for both the mi-class/hi-class contrast in Anatolian with the durative-aorist-perfect system of Core IE dialects.

    Interesting quirks of a PIE subjective-objective model

  • So this is in part why I'm now pursuing a hunch that Arretium could perhaps be a Greek name in the end, namely from Erythrion, a name built on the word erythros 'red' ( durative, mi-class) and those unmarked by it ( aorist, past) on the one hand, and subjective verbs marked with *-r ( middle) and those without ( hi-class, perfect-stative) on the other.

    Archive 2009-09-01

  • We can then take note of an interesting aspectual contrast between *bʰḗr-m̥ 'I carry/carried' with no specific event being conveyed (potentially habitual), and the semelfactivizing quality of the sigmatic form *bʰḗr-s-m̥ 'I have carried (once)', acting essentially like a perfective for inherently durative verbs.

    Looking for a simple origin to Hittite's hi-class preterite

  • However, I came to realize that if, for whatever reason, the e-reduplication seen in the eventual perfect forms were not as ancient as the i-reduplicated forms seen in the durative present, then perhaps we could suggest something simpler:

    How old is the reduplicated perfect in Indo-European?

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