Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To make brown or dusky.
  • transitive v. To darken.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To make brown or dusky.
  • v. To become brown or dusky.
  • v. To darken, make dark.
  • v. To darken, become dark.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To give a brown color to; to imbrown.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To make brown; darken.
  • To make dark or obscure.
  • To grow or become brown; acquire a brownish hue.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. cause to darken
  • v. make brown in color

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Contradictory as it may be, the most earnest advocates of the “White Australia” principle use more than the average quantity of oil, which makes the skin to shine and embrown under the influence of the much-loved sun.

    Tropic Days

  • Contradictory as it may be, the most earnest advocates of the "White Australia" principle use more than the average quantity of oil, which makes the skin to shine and embrown under the influence of the much-loved sun.

    Tropic Days

  • There had been a good deal of joking, both Spanish and English, among the passengers; I had found particularly cheering the richness of a certain machinist's trousers of bright golden corduroy; but as the shades of night began to embrown the scene our spirits fell; and at the cry of a lonesome bird, far off where the sunset had been, they followed the sun in its sudden drop.

    Familiar Spanish Travels

  • It appears to me that the paper will absorb its proper dose of iodine better when dry, and the glacial acetic acid will set free any small amount of alkaline potash there may be on the surface; so that it will not embrown on applying gallic acid.

    Notes and Queries, Number 181, April 16, 1853 A Medium of Inter-communication for Literary Men, Artists, Antiquaries, Genealogists, etc.

  • Isle of Shepey, had he not, on board the Fire-fly, chosen to embrown his face, and carry black ringlets over his own; a trick, perchance, to set the Protector on a wrong scent.

    The Buccaneer A Tale

  • The coffin was palled with a square of rusty black velvet, whence all the pile had long been worn, and which the soaking rain now helped age to embrown and make flabby; a standard cross was borne by an ecclesiastical official, who had on a quadrangular cap surmounted by a centre tuft; two priests followed, sheltered by umbrellas, their sacerdotal garments dabbled and draggled with mud, and showing thick-shod feet beneath the dingy serge and lawn that flapped above them, as they came along at a smart pace, suggestive of anything but solemnity.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 18, No. 107, September, 1866

  • There had been a good deal of joking, both Spanish and English, among the passengers; I had found particularly cheering the richness of a certain machinist’s trousers of bright golden corduroy; but as the shades of night began to embrown the scene our spirits fell; and at the cry of a lonesome bird, far off where the sunset had been, they followed the sun in its sudden drop.

    Familiar Spanish Travels

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