Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A stanza of Welsh poetry.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In Welsh poetry, a stanza (now always a quatrain) of a certain metrical structure.

Etymologies

From Welsh englyn. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • If the englyn is the British equivalent of the haiku, then the great Welsh poet

    Culture | guardian.co.uk

  • But disregarding for now the possibly that Hector might not know an englyn from an awdl, there seems to be a grain of truth in that comment.

    Pidgin Stryd | Quixotic Quisling

  • Amongst these compositions was a Welsh englyn on the

    Wild Wales : Its People, Language and Scenery

  • What a triumph for Wales; what a triumph for bardism, if Lleiaf had ever written an englyn, or couplet, in which not a bridge for common traffic, but a railroad bridge over the Menai was hinted at, and steam travelling distinctly foretold!

    Wild Wales : Its People, Language and Scenery

  • He said that he had himself won the prize for the best englyn on a particular subject at an eisteddfod at which Sir Watkin Williams Wynn presided, and at which Heber, afterwards Bishop of Calcutta, was present, who appeared to understand Welsh well, and who took much interest in the proceedings of the meeting.

    Wild Wales : Its People, Language and Scenery

  • The tablet bore the following inscription, and below it a rude englyn on death not worth transcribing: -

    Wild Wales : Its People, Language and Scenery

  • “The ale I shall find bad,” said I; Chester ale had a villainous character in the time of old Sion Tudor, who made a first-rate englyn upon it, and it has scarcely improved since; “but I shall have a treat in the cheese, Cheshire cheese has always been reckoned excellent, and now that I am in the capital of the cheese country, of course I shall have some of the very prime.”

    Wild Wales : Its People, Language and Scenery

  • And as surely as the couplet about the bridge argues great foresight in the man that wrote it, so surely does the englyn prove that its author must have been possessed of the faculty of second sight, as nobody without it could, in the middle of the seventeenth century, when the powers of steam were unknown, have written anything in which travelling by steam is so distinctly alluded to.

    Wild Wales : Its People, Language and Scenery

  • The above englyn was printed in the Greal, 1792, p. 316; the language shows it to be a production of about the middle of the seventeenth century.

    Wild Wales : Its People, Language and Scenery

  • Welsh bard, who flourished at the beginning of the seventeenth century, wrote an englyn upon it, of which the following is a translation: -

    Wild Wales : Its People, Language and Scenery

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.