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Etymologies

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Examples

  • level four, what I have called eudaimonic, major differences from the standard understanding of the MoQ, which you're familiar with.

    A Christian interpretation of the MoQ

  • There is some evidence that people high in eudaimonic well-being process emotional information differently than those who are low in it.

    Is Happiness Overrated?

  • Researchers refer to this latter state as "eudaimonic well-being."

    Is Happiness Overrated?

  • Psychologists investigating eudaimonic versus hedonic types of happiness over the past five to 10 years have looked at each type's unique effects on physical and psychological health.

    Is Happiness Overrated?

  • Participants with low education level and greater eudaimonic well-being had lower levels of interleukin-6, an inflammatory marker of disease associated with cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and Alzheimer's disease, than those with lower eudaimonic well-being, even after taking hedonic well-being into account.

    Is Happiness Overrated?

  • Brain-imaging studies indicate people with high eudaimonic well-being tend to use the pre-frontal cortex more than people with lower eudaimonic well-being, says Cariem van Reekum , researcher at the Centre for Integrative Neuroscience and Neurodynamics at the University of Reading in the U.K. The pre-frontal cortex is important to higher-order thinking, including goal-setting, language and memory.

    Is Happiness Overrated?

  • It could be that people with high eudaimonic well-being are good at reappraising situations and using the brain more actively to see the positives, Dr. van Reekum says.

    Is Happiness Overrated?

  • David Bennett , director of the Alzheimer's Disease Center at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, and his colleagues showed that eudaimonic well-being conferred benefits related to Alzheimer's.

    Is Happiness Overrated?

  • Simply engaging in activities that are likely to promote eudaimonic well-being, such as helping others, doesn't seem to yield a psychological benefit if people feel pressured to do them, according to a study Dr. Ryan and a colleague published last year in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.

    Is Happiness Overrated?

  • But opinions clashed on the relationship between the two: Could you be happy if you were virtuous and poor, or did you also need some external things, such as wealth, to fully realize your eudaimonic potential?

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