Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A ferule.
  • n. The imperial sceptre in the Byzantine Empire.

Etymologies

Latin ferula giant fennel (whose stalks were once used in punishing schoolboys), rod, whip, from ferire to strike. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The second had, instead of the crook, a knob which was often surmounted by a cross, and was called the ferula or cambuta.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 4: Clandestinity-Diocesan Chancery

  • The bishop puts the stole (orarium) on the left shoulder of a deacon, and delivers a "ferula" to an archdeacon and archpriest, a "manuale" (book of sacraments) to a priest, and a staff and book of the Rule to an abbot.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 10: Mass Music-Newman

  • 1117, [Greek: narthêx] is "ferula" or "fennel-giant," the pith of which makes excellent fuel.

    Aeschylus' Prometheus Bound and the Seven Against Thebes

  • The old gentleman jumped up, ferula in hand, and darted across the school, and saw himself upon the fatal slate.

    Westward Ho!

  • What advantage is it to be a man, over it is to be a boy at school, if we have only escaped the ferula to come under the fescue of an Imprimatur; if serious and elaborate writings, as if they were no more than the theme of a grammar-lad under his pedagogue, must not be uttered without the cursory eyes of a temporizing and extemporizing licenser?

    Areopagitica

  • Others think that this proverb admonisheth the guests to forget everything that is spoken or done in company; and agreeably to this, the ancients used to consecrate forgetfulness with a ferula to Bacchus, thereby intimating that we should either not remember any irregularity committed in mirth and company, or apply a gentle and childish correction to the faults.

    Essays and Miscellanies

  • Had I not three strokes of a ferula given me, two on my right hand, and one on my left, for calling

    The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

  • Sertorius, began to waver and revolt; whereupon Sertorius uttered various arrogant and scornful speeches against Pompey, saying in derision, that he should want no other weapon but a ferula and rod to chastise this boy with, if he were not afraid of that old woman, meaning Metellus.

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

  • A great number of Christians of {364} all ages and sexes were banished, beaten, and tortured divers ways, especially by being buffeted on the face with a terrible kind of armed ferula, one blow of which would knock the teeth out, and make the head swell exceedingly.

    The Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Principal Saints January, February, March

  • What advantage is it to be a man over it is to be a boy at school, if we have only escaped the ferula to come under the fescue of an Imprimatur? if serious and elaborate writings, as if they were no more than the theme of a grammar-lad under his pedagog, must not be uttered without the cursory eyes of a temporizing and extemporizing licenser?

    Plea for the Liberty of Unlicensed Printing

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