Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Faith personified as a goddess; the goddess of faith.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Faith.
  • n. In Roman mythology, the goddess of faith or fidelity, commonly represented as a matron wearing a wreath of oliveor laurel-leaves, and having in her hand ears of corn or a basket of fruit.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Sometimes the lesser man was said to be "in feu" to the greater; the Latin word fides, i.e., "the bond of honour", was a technical word employed.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 8: Infamy-Lapparent

  • Indeed, the word fiduciary comes from the Latin word fides, meaning faith.

    David McWilliams

  • It’s called faith from the Latin fides, which means to make a commitment to something.

    The Dawkins Paradox

  • My free market bona fides are as good as anyone's, and I have become increasingly suspicious of corporatiions -- principally because I see them as a threat to free enterprise.

    Eternal vigilance ...

  • Since it is not italicized, I assume it is pronounced as English, so fides rhymes with rides.

    Word Court

  • Much I suppose could be made of the man's law enforcement bona fides, which is strange because Kerry Healey's sole qualification for public office in 2002 was a pair of criminal justice monographs she wrote for Abt Associates.

    The Chimes at Midnight

  • Neither let that be feared which is said, Fronti nulla fides, which is meant of a general outward behaviour, and not of the private and subtle motions and labours of the countenance and gesture; which, as Q. Cicero elegantly saith, is Animi janua, “the gate of the mind.”

    The Advancement of Learning

  • Public acts, official records, ought to be either the originals (engrossed) or authentic copies, i.e., certified to be faithful copies of the original preserved in the protocol, the notary who transcribes the document witnessing on the copy itself that it is exact; this is what is known as fides instrumentorum, or trustworthiness of the documents.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • Neither let that be feared which is said, Fronti nulla fides, which is meant of a general outward behaviour, and not of the private and subtle motions and labours of the countenance and gesture; which, as Q. Cicero elegantly saith, is Animi janua, "the gate of the mind."

    The Advancement of Learning

  • AD: Much is made that AZ’s requirement that resident-aliens be able to prove their bona fides is a new imposition upon them, since the average person has little anticipation of being contacted by Federal LE.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » Why the Arizona Law is Much Worse than the Federal Law It is Supposedly Based On

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