Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A long, shallow basket with two handles.
  • n. A vessel for serving food.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A long, shallow basket, with two handles.
  • n. A small flask.
  • n. A vessel in which viands are served.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A small flask, especially one for powder: probably same as morsing-horn.
  • n. A vessel in which viands are served.
  • n. A long shallow basket.

Etymologies

Compare Welsh fflasged a vessel of straw or wickerwork, fflasg flask, basket, and English flask. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Then the witch-wife took up the flasket and pulled out the stopple and betook it to Birdalone, and said: Drink of this now, a little sip, no more.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • But what it was, that shall ye hear anon when we carried the matter through; but I bade Baudoin still carry the flasket till the evening.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • And therewith I held the flasket aloft; but her face changed horribly; she sprang up in her chair and reached out her arm to clutch at the flasket, screaming like an eagle therewith.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • There I told them all the tale of the last night and of the flasket, and put before them all that was in my mind to do that evening at the banquet, and they both of them yeasaid it.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • Then I rose up and put my hand to my bosom (for Baudoin had given me the flasket ere we came to the perron): I spake in a loud voice, and it sounded wild and hard in the goodly hall: My lady, I said, thou art looking but pale now, and sick and downcast.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • Drink now to me out of this precious flasket, and thou shalt be whole and well.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • Then I turned about to my two fellows, and they stood bewildered, not knowing what was toward; and I came to them and made them drink of the flasket, and their eyes were opened and the strength of giants came to them, and they ran each to his sweetling; but Baudoin, before ever he kissed Aurea, caught hold of the chain that bound her to the pillar, and by main force dragged it out.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • Wherefore the she-wolf went red and white by turns, and fumed, and fretted her bedizenments with unrestful hands, and when she should let us go our ways, she lingered and looked back oft, and was loth to depart ere she had gotten what she lacked, and that, forsooth, was the said flasket.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • Then Sir Tristram took the flasket in his hand, and said, Madam Isoud, here is the best drink that ever ye drank, that Dame Bragwaine, your maiden, and

    Le Morte d'Arthur: Sir Thomas Malory's book of King Arthur and of his noble knights of the Round table

  • Tristram took the sea, and La Beale Isoud; and when they were in their cabin, it happed so that they were thirsty, and they saw a little flasket of gold stand by them, and it seemed by the colour and the taste that it was noble wine.

    Le Morte d'Arthur: Sir Thomas Malory's book of King Arthur and of his noble knights of the Round table

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