Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A hole in a volcanic area from which hot smoke and gases escape.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An opening in the crust of an astronomical body that emits steam and gases.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A hole or spot in a volcanic or other region, from which fumes issue.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A hole from which vapor issues in a Sulphur-mine or a volcano.
  • n. Sainte-Claire Deville distinguishes the following: Dry fumaroles, which are very hot and yield volatilized anhydrous (for example, ferric) chlorids.
  • n. Acid fumaroles, which yield sulphurous and hydrochloric fumes and steam.
  • n. Alkaline fumaroles, which yield sal ammoniac and steam at approximately 212° F.
  • n. Cold fumaroles, below 212° F., which yield steam, carbon dioxid, sulphureted hydrogen, etc.

Etymologies

Italian fumarola, from Late Latin fūmāriolum, smoke hole, diminutive of Latin fūmārium, smoke chamber, from fūmus, smoke.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From the Italian fumarola. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Despite the low turnout, however, business was conducted: the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull, which generated by far the most buzz on the show floor, landed a seven-figure deal for a memoir that will cover its early days as a steam-venting fumarole right through to its headline-making eruption.

    Laurence Hughes: Things I'd Like to See This Weekend on C-SPAN's "Book TV"

  • The Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull, which generated by far the most buzz on the show floor, landed a seven-figure deal for a memoir that will cover its early days as a steam-venting fumarole right through to its headline-making eruption.

    Laurence Hughes: Things I'd Like to See This Weekend on C-SPAN's "Book TV"

  • Sandra had us scramble back to the top for another try though the fumarole passage, but again, when we got into the thick of it, we were practically overcome.

    Richard Bangs: Climbing the Killer Prince -- Merapi Volcano of Java, Part 1

  • The last eruption was observed in the 1970's, but some fumarole activity still occurs in one of the craters.

    Area de Conservación Guanacaste, Costa Rica

  • There is also a fumarole known as Valley of Desolation (or Grand Soufriere), with fumaroles, hot springs, mud pots, sulfur vents and the Boiling Lake, which is the world's second largest of its kind.

    Morne Trois Pitons, Dominica

  • Above about 4,600 m, very few plants are able to survive the severe conditions, although specimens of Helichrysum newii have been recorded as high as 5,760 m (close to a fumarole), and mosses and lichens are found right up to the summit.

    Kilimanjaro National Park, Tanzania

  • After I had breakfasted with Montgomery, he took me across the island to see the fumarole and the source of the hot spring into whose scalding waters I had blundered on the previous day.

    The Island of Doctor Moreau

  • It wasn't until she'd pushed herself across the command deck and gently touched his arm that he pointed down at the massive fumarole below them.

    Asimov's Science Fiction

  • Theoderos Tesfai, an Eritrean geochemist, collects a sample of fumarolic gas at As'ela, a fumarole on Alid's north flank.

    alidphotos.html

  • I realized then that the outdoor cooker was a natural fumarole, a geological feature that I recalled was common on the northern continent of Seriphos.

    Perseus Spur

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