Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The leap of a horse
  • n. A prank or frolic

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A spatterdash or gaiter for covering the leg when riding or walking in muddy roads.
  • n. plural Boots fixed to the saddle of a horseman, instead of stirrups.
  • n. The leap of a horse.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • A more awkward situation could hardly be imagined than that of a privy councillor forced to listen to and reply to his sovereign, while each fresh gambade of his unmanageable horse placed him in a new and more precarious attitude — his violet robe flying loose in every direction, and nothing securing him from an instant and perilous fall save the depth of the saddle, and its height before and behind.

    Quentin Durward

  • As, under the influence of these joyous recollections, he gave his horse the spur, and made him execute a gambade, he instantly incurred the censure of his grave neighbour, who hinted to him to keep the pace, and move quietly and in order, unless he wished such notice to be taken of his eccentric movements as was likely to be very displeasing to him.

    The Abbot

  • This chieftain was, as right and reason craved, the first to enter the lists, and passing the Gallery at the head of his myrmidons, kissed the hilt of his sword to the Queen, and executed at the same time a gambade, the like whereof had never been practised by two-legged hobby-horse.

    Kenilworth

  • One only lingered, the black-browed Baron Brocas, who, making a gambade which brought him within arm-sweep of the serf, slashed him across the face with his riding-whip.

    The White Company

  • Brocas, who, making a gambade which brought him within arm-sweep of the serf, slashed him across the face with his riding-whip.

    The White Company

  • There were two cross-roads before they reached the Lymington Ford, and at each of then Sir Nigel pulled up his horse, and waited with many a curvet and gambade, craning his neck this way and that to see if fortune would send him a venture.

    The White Company

  • He touched his horse with the spur, gave a _gambade_ which took him across to the carriage, and then, sweeping off his hat, he bowed to his horse's neck; a salute in which he was imitated, though in a somewhat ungainly fashion, by his companion.

    The Refugees

  • If the book does sometimes in a fashion "hop forty paces in the public street," and at others gambade in a less decorous fashion even than hopping, it is also Cleopatresque in its absolute freedom from staleness and from tedium.

    A History of the French Novel, Vol. 1 From the Beginning to 1800

  • I should think it would! after yesterday's gambade, What did Mr. Carlisle say to you, I should like to know?

    The Old Helmet

  • A more awkward situation could hardly be imagined than that of a privy councillor forced to listen to and reply to his sovereign, while each fresh gambade of his unmanageable horse placed him in

    Quentin Durward

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