Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A taxicab driver. Also called hack2, hacker2.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A taxicab driver.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The driver of a taxicab; a hackman.

Etymologies

From hack (“taxicab”) +‎ -ie. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • They went out and got their cab, and when the hackie dropped them on Lansdowne Street, John tipped him a buck.

    Blaze

  • It had been years, it seemed, since a New York hackie had opened a door for her.

    Give Us Forever

  • The hackie showed no sign of interest when we climbed into his cab and Wolfe told him where to go.

    The Black Mountain

  • Also, he hadn't mentioned that he had no job and no prospects and that almost his last dollar had gone into paying the check at The Dancers for a bit of high class fluff that couldn't stick around long enough to make sure he didn't get tossed in the sneezer by some prowl car boys, or rolled by a tough hackie and dumped out in a vacant lot.

    Rex Parker Does the NYT Crossword Puzzle

  • \tab Waving a five-dollar bill in front of the railroad station got him a taxi, but the hackie insisted on picking up three more passengers going south after asking what direction Lazarus was going.

    Time Enough For Love

  • "Actually, sir," Muldoon told him, "I don't think any but an honest hackie is likely to be stoppin 'for you.

    The Lunatic Fringe

  • The cab stopped with a jerk that justified Wolfe’s attitude toward machinery, and the hackie stuck his head out and objected.

    The Black Mountain

  • He remembered a taxi driver who had refused to understand his request to be taken to the Continental Hotel until he had written the name down, after which the hackie had said, miming sudden comprehension: "Ah, ah!

    A Case Of Conscience

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Comments

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  • . . . almost his last dollar had gone into paying the check at The Dancers for a bit of high class fluff that couldn't stick around long enough to make sure he didn't get tossed in the sneezer by some prowl car boys, or rolled by a tough hackie and dumped out in a vacant lot.
    Raymond Chandler, 1953, The Long Goodbye, chapter 1

    September 5, 2009