Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Blood within vomitus; the vomiting of blood.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A vomiting of blood.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In pathology, a vomiting of blood.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. vomiting blood

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Its fruitpulp is used as mild laxative, against fevers, arthritis, vatavyadhi (nervous system diseases), all kinds of rakta-pitta (bleeding, such as hematemesis or hemorrhages), as well as cardiac conditions and stomach problems such as acid reflux.

    Find Me A Cure

  • Nausea, vomiting and hematemesis are quite common and may occur in patients with only mild theophylline toxicity.

    Theophylline

  • The severe gastrointestinal bleeding causes frequent, and at times violent, hematemesis (vomiting of blood), and it was this symptom that earned the sickness the name of vómito prieto.

    Pestilence and Headcolds: Encountering Illness in Colonial Mexico

  • Blaxland 10.202 relates the instance of a woman of forty-five who swallowed a fish bone, was seized with violent hematemesis, and died in eight hours.

    Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine

  • An additional element of complication in this case was the occurrence of occasional attacks of hematemesis.

    Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine

  • D'Andradé 1.6 cites an account of a healthy Parsee lady, eighteen years of age, who menstruated regularly from thirteen to fifteen and a half years; the catamenia then became irregular and she suffered occasional hemorrhages from the gums and nose, together with attacks of hematemesis.

    Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine

  • In this connection may be mentioned the case reported by Hanford 12.129 of a man of twenty-three who had an attack of hematemesis and melanema two years before death.

    Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine

  • Channing 14.171 gives an account of the case of Helen Miller, a German Jewess of thirty, who was admitted to the Asylum for Insane Criminals at Auburn, N. Y., in October, 1872, and readmitted in June, 1875, suffering from simulation of hematemesis.

    Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine

  • A sharp angle of the broken plate had caught in a fold of the cardiac end of the stomach and had caused violent hematemesis.

    Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine

  • Blaxland relates the instance of a woman of forty-five who swallowed a fish bone, was seized with violent hematemesis, and died in eight hours.

    Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine

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