Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The tendency of individuals to associate with others of the same kind

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • HOMOPHILY BIRDS OF A FEATHER FLOCK TOGETHER The term homophily stems from study of social networks.

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  • "Uniting disparate groups on a single Internet service runs counter to 50 years of research by sociologists into what is known as 'homophily' -- the tendency of individuals to associate only with like-minded people of similar age and ethnicity."

    Fast Times at Facebook High

  • She points to studies undertaken by researchers at the University of New Hampshire and elsewhere that suggests "homophily" -- the principle that people naturally favor others like them -- may play a major role in early-stage funding.

    We Need More Female Venture Capitalists

  • Sociologists call this phenomenon of being affected by one's friends "homophily" -- the tendency to associate with people similar to you and the people you associate with tend to act like you over time (and vice-versa).

    Auren Hoffman: You Think For Yourself but You Act Like Your Friends (on homophily)

  • From communication research we know it comes from credibility defined largely by expertise, trust, conviction, comfort and something called homophily (perceived similarity).

    Kathleen Reardon: Barack Obama -- More Presidential By The Day

  • People, we worry, spend too much of their time seeking out like-minded peers a phenomenon called homophily and thus encounter only news and opinions that reinforce what they already believe.

    Wired Top Stories

  • From communication research we know it comes from credibility defined largely by expertise, trust, conviction, comfort and something called homophily

    The Full Feed from HuffingtonPost.com

  • As Metzger explains, "The early thought on social networks was that people would self-select -- so-called 'homophily' -- but evidence now suggests that in seeking political information, it works the other way around.

    Rory O'Connor: The Daily We

  • As Metzger explains, "The early thought on social networks was that people would self-select - so-called 'homophily' - but evidence now suggests that in seeking political information, it works the other way around.

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  • His whole insult shtick is based on the other posters being cliquish (a word that a lot more adults use than "homophily", which actually has a derisively small number of Google hits) and immature.

    SurveyUSA: Hillary Ahead By 18 Points In Pennsylvania Primary

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Comments

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  • Nice article. Thanks for posting, John.

    February 19, 2009

  • “The faintly depressing human tendency to seek out and spend time with those most similar to us is known in social science as "homophily", and it shapes our views, and our lives, in ways we're barely aware of.�?

    The Guardian, This column will change your life, by Oliver Burkeman, January 31, 2009

    February 18, 2009