honorificabilitudinitatibus love

honorificabilitudinitatibus

Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. the state of being able to achieve honors
  • n. a sesquipedalian word; verbal prolixity

Etymologies

Dative and ablative plural of Medieval Latin honorificabilitudinitas, from Latin honor and habilitās (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Contains the longest word in Shakespeare at 27 letters: "honorificabilitudinitatibus" - Act V, Scene 1.

    Conservapedia - Recent changes [en]

  • This explanation of the real meaning to be derived from the long word honorificabilitudinitatibus seems to be so convincing as scarcely to require further proof.

    Bacon is Shake-Speare

  • He uses the word "honorificabilitudinitatibus," and some of his blunders are very ridiculous, as "ad dunghill, at the fingers 'ends, as they say" (act v. I).

    Character Sketches of Romance, Fiction and the Drama, Vol. 1 A Revised American Edition of the Reader's Handbook

  • Like John o'Gaunt his name is dear to him, as dear as the coat and crest he toadied for, on a bend sable a spear or steeled argent, honorificabilitudinitatibus, dearer than his glory of greatest shakescene in the country.

    Ulysses

  • A few years later, when I came across the 13-syllable "honorificabilitudinitatibus" in Love's Labour Lost, it was another epiphany.

    Telegraph.co.uk - Telegraph online, Daily Telegraph and Sunday Telegraph

  • V. i.44 (427,6) [_honorificabilitudinitatibus_] This word, whencesoever it comes, is often mentioned as the longest word known.

    Notes to Shakespeare — Volume 01: Comedies

  • I marvel thy master hath not eaten thee for a word; for thou art not so long by the head as honorificabilitudinitatibus: thou art easier swallowed than a flap-dragon.

    Love's Labour's Lost

  • John o’Gaunt his name is dear to him, as dear as the coat and crest he toadied for, on a bend sable a spear or steeled argent, honorificabilitudinitatibus, dearer than his glory of greatest shakescene in the country.

    Ulysses

  • "revealed" interpretation of the long word honorificabilitudinitatibus.

    Bacon is Shake-Speare

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Comments

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  • JM recommends honours be bestowed upon the word 'Honorificabilitudinitatibus', 27 letters long, and it's the longest English word consisting strictly of alterating consonants and vowels.

    October 12, 2009

  • The state of being honored.

    June 13, 2009

  • JM understands that Shakespeare invented the term honorificabilitudinitatibus ... what a terrific word eh!

    February 1, 2009


  • O, they have lived long on the alms-basket of words.
    I marvel thy master hath not eaten thee for a word;
    for thou art not so long by the head as
    honorificabilitudinitatibus: thou art easier
    swallowed than a flap-dragon.

    - Shakespeare, 'Love’s Labour’s Lost'.

    November 8, 2008

  • the longest word consisting entirely of alternating vowels and consonants.

    November 5, 2007

  • This, from futilitycloset.com:

    The longest word in Shakespeare appears in Act V, Scene 1 of Love’s Labour’s Lost:

    O, they have lived long on the alms-basket of words.
    I marvel thy master hath not eaten thee for a word;
    for thou art not long by the head as
    honorificabilitudinitatibus: thou art easier
    swallowed than a flap-dragon.


    It’s the ablative plural of the Latin honorificabilitudinitas, “the state of being able to achieve honors.” And it can be rearranged to spell hi ludi, F. Baconis nati, tuiti orbi, which means “These plays, F. Bacon’s offspring, are preserved for the world.”

    So that settles that.

    December 1, 2006