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Examples

  • As might be expected, this stretch of the ice-field was broken by innumerable crevasses, rendering any passage across it impossible.

    The South Pole~ The Eastern Sledge Journey

  • There was warmth in the air which could be felt, even on this immense ice-field.

    The South Pole~ On the Barrier

  • Over by Fridtjof Nansen we could not go; this mountain here rose perpendicularly, in parts quite bare, and formed with the glacier a surface so wild and cut up that all thoughts of crossing the ice-field in that direction had to be instantly abandoned.

    The South Pole~ Through the Mountains

  • As we thought, there was a side-glacier coming down into it, with large, ugly crevasses in many places; but it was not so bad as to prevent our finally reaching, with caution and using good brakes, the great main ice-field -- Axel Heiberg Glacier.

    The South Pole~ Through the Mountains

  • As we thought, there was a side-glacier coming down into it, with large, ugly crevasses in many places; but it was not so bad as to prevent our finally reaching, with caution and using good brakes, the great main ice-field — Axel Heiberg Glacier.

    The South Pole; an account of the Norwegian antarctic expedition in the 'Fram', 1910 to 1912

  • By its own power of impulsion our apparatus made a canal for itself; some times carried away by its own impetus, it lodged on the ice-field, crushing it with its weight, and sometimes buried beneath it, dividing it by a simple pitching movement, producing large rents in it.

    Twenty-Thousand Leagues Under the Sea

  • The iceberg was by degrees becoming an ice-field, the mountain a plain.

    Twenty-Thousand Leagues Under the Sea

  • These creatures have the instinct to break holes in the ice-field and to keep them open.

    Twenty-Thousand Leagues Under the Sea

  • Then, impelled by its powerful screw, it attacked the ice-field from beneath like a formidable battering-ram.

    Twenty-Thousand Leagues Under the Sea

  • It broke it by backing and then rushing forward against the field, which gradually gave way; and at last, dashing suddenly against it, shot forwards on the ice-field, that crushed beneath its weight.

    Twenty-Thousand Leagues Under the Sea

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  • "The ice-field begins in late summer as young ice in Baffin Bay. Slowly it moves south. In November off Labrador the sea is dappled by small circular pieces of ice that have been chopped and crushed to a snowy consistency by wind and sea. Under winter's encouragement this grows rapidly into blocks six to ten feet in diameter, a lovely translucent green with white edges created by constant grinding against other pans. This is known to mariners and sealers as slob ice. On calm winter nights off the Labrador coast the sea freezes until these blocks are embedded in large sheets of ice that may be several miles in length, but are constantly forming and reforming under pressure of sea and wind. This becomes the sheet ice that is the home of the whelping seals."
    --Cassie Brown with Harold Horwood, Death on the Ice: The Great Newfoundland Sealing Disaster of 1914, Doubleday Canada, 1972.

    December 10, 2007