Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The state or quality of being incorporeal; immateriality.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The state or characteristic of being incorporeal.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The quality of being incorporeal; immateriality.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The quality of being incorporeal; disembodied existence; immateriality.

Etymologies

Medieval Latin incorporeit─üs, from Latin incorporeus, incorporeal; see incorporeal.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • Thought of the divine incorporeity was suggested by absence of any altar-image.

    Autobiography of a Yogi

  • Zeus-given incorporeity was the one person who had a good view of the scene at large, you must pardon me for having withheld the veil of indirect narration.

    Zuleika Dobson, or, an Oxford love story

  • He must strive to come in contact with the spiritual forms, which ascend in increasing degrees of incorporeity from the ideas of the individual soul up to the Actual Intellect itself, above which are only the forms of celestial bodies, that is to say, spiritual substances which, while they have an important cosmic function, have no relation to moral excellence in man.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 2: Assizes-Browne

  • And so, as I by my Zeus-given incorporeity was the one person who had a good view of the scene at large, you must pardon me for having withheld the veil of indirect narration.

    Zuleika Dobson

  • The arguments for the existence, unity, and incorporeity of God divide the Arabic philosophers into two schools.

    Jewish Literature and Other Essays

  • But alas! nothing save incorporeity could have availed her.

    St. George and St. Michael Volume II

  • If incorporeity is the motive-power of this nature, it no longer exists independently; it, in fact, exists no longer than the subject to which it is inherent subsists.

    The System of Nature, Volume 2

  • Has the multitude of subtle distinctions, with which theology in some countries is filled throughout; have the words spirit, immateriality, incorporeity, predestination, grace, with other ingenious inventions, imagined by sublime thinkers, who during so many ages have succeeded each other, actually had any other effect than to perplex things; to render the whole obscure; decidedly unintelligible?

    The System of Nature, Volume 2

  • Whose capacity embraces spirituality, immateriality, incorporeity, or the mysteries of which he is every day informed?

    The System of Nature, Volume 2

  • It is impossible for man, for a material being, to form to himself a correct idea, or indeed any idea, of incorporeity; of

    The System of Nature, Volume 2

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