Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A wig, notably made of worsted wool

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A wig; -- so called, perhaps, from being made of, or resembling, Jersey yarn.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A kind of wig, originally one made of worsted; a jersey.

Etymologies

Probably a corruption of jersey, itself named after the Anglo-Norman Channel island Jersey (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Dowager went off in her jingling old coach, attended by two faithful and withered old maids of honour, and a little snuffy spindle-shanked gentleman in waiting, in a brown jasey and a green coat covered with orders — of which the star and the grand yellow cordon of the order of St. Michael of Pumpernickel were most conspicuous.

    Vanity Fair

  • "Mr. Bensley, darling, put on your jasey!" cried the gallery.

    A Book of the Play Studies and Illustrations of Histrionic Story, Life, and Character

  • Lady Kicklebury wears a front, and, I make no doubt, a complete jasey; or she certainly would have let down her back hair at this minute, so overpowering were her feelings, and so bitter her indignation at her daughter's black ingratitude.

    The Christmas Books of Mr. M.A. Titmarsh

  • "Hadn't you better settle your wig?" says I, offering it to him on the tip of my cane, "and we'll arrange time and place when you have put your jasey in order."

    Burlesques

  • Lady Kicklebury wears a front, and, I make no doubt, a complete jasey; or she certainly would have let down her back hair at this minute, so overpowering were her feelings, and so bitter her indignation at her daughter’s black ingratitude.

    The Kickleburys on the Rhine

  • “Hadn’t you better settle your wig?” says I, offering it to him on the tip of my cane, “and we’ll arrange time and place when you have put your jasey in order.”

    Novels by Eminent Hands

  • a brown jasey and a green coat covered with orders -- of which the star and the grand yellow cordon of the order of St. Michael of Pumpernickel were most conspicuous.

    Vanity Fair

  • And then turning to Father Dominick, whose contemptuous rejection of the coarse favour so accidentally conferred, had not escaped our Irishman’s notice, he frankly assured him, that “however a greasy jasey might disgrace a friar’s head, it could do no injury to his heart, since that was too black to receive any damage from trifles, and too deeply intrenched by cunning and cruelty to be injured by common assaults.”

    The Irish Guardian, or, Errors of Eccentricity

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.