Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Any of several large North American trees, of the genus Liriodendron, that have tulip-like flowers; especially Liriodendron tulipifera, the tulip tree

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A genus of large and very beautiful trees of North America, having smooth, shining leaves, and handsome, tuliplike flowers; tulip tree; whitewood; -- called also canoewood. Liriodendron tulipifera is the only extant species, but there were several others in the Cretaceous epoch.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A genus of North American trees, consisting of a single species, belonging to the order Magnoliace√¶, tribe Magnolie√¶, characterized by extrorse anthers and a sessile gynophore; the tulip-trees.
  • n. [lowercase] A tree of this genus.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. tulip trees

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • (_Morus rubra_), the pale-green leaves of the catalpa, the tall tulip-tree (_liriodendron_), and the shining foliage of the orange.

    The Boy Hunters

  • The beautiful tulip-tree (_liriodendron_) was easily distinguished by its straight column-like trunks, out of which are sawed those great planks of _white poplar_ you may have seen, for that is the name by which it is known among carpenters and builders.

    The Boy Hunters

  • I sat down upon a log -- that same log of the liriodendron -- and under the shade of a spreading dogwood-tree.

    The Quadroon Adventures in the Far West

  • "The road is strait and spacious and kept in excellent repair by the industrious inhabitants, and is generally bordered by tall and spreading trees as the magnolia, liquid amber, liriodendron, catalpa and live oak, and on the verges of the canals where the road was causewayed, stood the cyprus, lacianthus and magnolia, all planted by nature and left standing by the virtuous inhabitants, to shade the road and perfume the sultry air.

    Agricultural Resources of Georgia. Address Before the Cotton Planters Convention of Georgia at Macon, December 13, 1860

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.