Definitions

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Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • MISS CAREY: Oh, a lollard is a disappointment of the hair.

    Writing for Vaudeville

  • In "The Lollard," when Miss Carey wants to disillusionize Angela, she does not sit down and argue her out of her insane infatuation for Fred; nor does she tell Angela that Fred is a "lollard" and weakly unmask him by describing his "lollard" points.

    Writing for Vaudeville

  • "The Lollard" piques curiosity -- what is a "lollard," you are inclined to want to know; it also carries

    Writing for Vaudeville

  • (He lifts his tired little wife up in his arms and as he goes out, she mutters:) You're not such a bad lollard after all.

    Writing for Vaudeville

  • When Fred Saltus dashes revealingly across the stage and back into his room again, "The Lollard's" climax is reached; and as soon as Angela exclaims "What 'a lollard '_that_ is!" there's a ring at the door bell and in comes Harry to win Angela completely with his regimentals and to carry her off and bring the curtain down --

    Writing for Vaudeville

  • ANGELA: Oh Miss Carey, what an awful lollard _that_ is.

    Writing for Vaudeville

  • ANGELA: Yes, I invented the word, and believe me, a woman suffers with a lollard.

    Writing for Vaudeville

  • His look went from brooder's beard to carper's skull, to remind, to chide them not unkindly, then to the baldpink lollard costard, guiltless though maligned.

    Ulysses

  • His look went from brooder’s beard to carper’s skull, to remind, to chide them not unkindly, then to the baldpink lollard costard, guiltless though maligned.

    Ulysses

  • Candelmasse, Richard Hunden, a wolle packer, was dampned as a fals heretyk and a lollard, and brent at the Tour hill, the whiche was of so large consciens that he wolde eten fleysh on Frydays. [

    A Chronicle of London from 1089 to 1483 Written in the Fifteenth Century, and for the First Time Printed from MSS. in the British Museum

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Comments

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  • The etymology I originally heard was that the Lollards would sing their church music (usually Psalms) without musical accompaniment, rather ubiquitously, and were thus said to be going around constantly singing "lol lol lol lol lol", or something of the sort.

    May 17, 2010

  • I'm definitely going to use this henceforth to apply to "those who use 'lol' too much" - just too priceless.

    May 16, 2010

  • Thanks.

    December 9, 2006

  • The newer meaning here is absolutely tremendous, I love it. I'm ok with shorthand and neologisms and brb and omg and all that, but this particular abbreviation -- lol -- I truly hate. The laughter I hear when someone types that at me is sacharine and false and makes my skin crawl. It's fake.

    And such an absurd definition is so much the better when paired with an otherwise ponderous and world-historical meaning. Just wonderful.

    December 9, 2006

  • "appropriated to mean those who use 'lol' too much" -clusterflock

    December 8, 2006

  • As seen on clusterflock.org ;-)

    December 7, 2006

  • Those who participated in a Pre-Reformation church movement in the 14th century. I, however, suggest another possible meaning.

    December 7, 2006