Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A dormer window.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A dormer-window.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A dormer window.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A dormer- or roof-window; also, a light or small window in a spire.

Etymologies

French, from Old French, alteration (influenced by luiserne, light) of Old Proven├žal lucana, possibly of Germanic origin .
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From French lucarne, from Germanic. See below. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • It is useless to dub a Frenchman unreal and theatrical when he gaily carries his unreality and his perception of the dramatic to the lucarne of the guillotine and meets imperturbably the most real thing on earth,

    The Last Hope

  • It is useless to dub a Frenchman unreal and theatrical when he gaily carries his unreality and his perception of the dramatic to the lucarne of the guillotine and meets imperturbably the most real thing on earth, Death.

    The Last Hope

  • From the cave of my ignorance, amid the fogs of my dulness, and pestilential fumes of my political heresies, I look up to thee, as doth a toad through the iron-barred lucarne of a pestiferous dungeon, to the cloudless glory of

    The Letters of Robert Burns

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