Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A confused heap; a throng or jumble, as of people or sounds.
  • v. To hurry carelessly.
  • v. To lug or pull about.
  • v. To daub; dirty.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A confused heap; a throng, as of persons; a jumble, as of sounds.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To hurry carelessly.
  • To lug; pull.
  • To daub; dirty.
  • n. A confused throng; a crowd; a heap.
  • n. A confusion; confused inarticulate sound or utterance; disturbance; tumult.
  • n. In coal-mining, a tram or car fitted with a device for taking up the slack of the rope used in hauling the cars.

Etymologies

Of obscure origin. See lorry. (Wiktionary)
Welsh llwry precipitant. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • And after a very great deal of talk -- almost as much as Mr. Miles's carrying had needed -- the altar stone was lifted, Quentin, curtains, awning and all, and carried along a gangway to the shore, and there it was put on a sort of cart, more like what people in Manchester call a lurry than anything else I can think of.

    The Magic World

  • I lurry, still clutching the telescope and trainers, jumped the last lew stairs and followed Dumbledore, who had settled himself in i he armchair nearest the fire and was taking in the surroundings wilh an expression of benign interest.

    Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

  • A Jacobean writer speaks of “the lurry of lawyers,” and “a lurry and rabble of poor friars.”

    The Journal to Stella

  • I long to be in Ireland; but the Ministry beg me to stay: however, when this Parliament lurry is over, I will endeavour to steal away; by which time I hope the First-Fruit business will be done.

    The Journal to Stella

  • I long to be in Ireland; but the Ministry beg me to stay: however, when this Parliament lurry [9] is over, I will endeavour to steal away; by which time I hope the First-Fruit business will be done.

    The Journal to Stella

  • A Jacobean writer speaks of "the lurry of lawyers," and

    The Journal to Stella

  • A haziness that had been in the sky, strengthened into a lurry of little cloudlets between us and the stars.

    A Poor Man's House

  • The mantelpiece and the corner cupboard, and the shelves behind the door, and the top of the chest of drawers and the bureau were all covered up with a perfect litter and lurry of old china.

    In Homespun

  • Ancoats pavements; the drunken lurryman tottering out from the public-house to his lurry under the biting sleet of February; the ragged barefoot boys and girls swarming and festering in the slums; the young men struggling all about him for subsistence and success -- these for the first time became realities to him, entered into that pondering of 'whence and whither' to which he had been always destined, and whereon he was now consciously started.

    The History of David Grieve

  • One on 'em borrowed a wheelbarrow, as they could'nt get a luggage lurry, an 'they had to wheel it up an' daan th 'haase floor i' ther turns, callin aght "By leave!"

    Yorksher Puddin' A Collection of the Most Popular Dialect Stories from the Pen of John Hartley

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