Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To cast in an unsuitable role.
  • transitive v. To cast (a role, play, or film) inappropriately.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To cast or reckon incorrectly.
  • v. To cast or direct erroneously or improperly.
  • v. To cast an actor in an inappropriate role.
  • v. To make an error when casting a vote.
  • n. An erroneous cast or reckoning.
  • adj. Erroneously cast

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. An erroneous cast or reckoning.
  • transitive v. To cast or reckon wrongly.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To east or reckon erroneously.
  • To cast or direct erroneously or improperly: as, to miscast a glance.
  • n. An erroneous cast or reckoning.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. cast an actor, singer, or dancer in an unsuitable role

Etymologies

From mis- +‎ cast. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Henry Hathaway's 1969 "True Grit" was neither "doddery" nor "miscast" - it was perfect; and Glen Campbell's character was not "a major character" - he was there to provide a little light ballast to the tense, central relationship between Mattie and Cogburn.

    With True Grit, the Coen brothers have given the western back its teeth

  • Tebow's autobiography, audaciously written when he was merely a 23-year-old second-string quarterback most critics called a miscast running back, came out in June.

    USATODAY.com News

  • He contended that that statement "was not accurate" and that he had "miscast" Obama's religious beliefs as racism.

    After Washington rally, Glenn Beck assails Obama's religion

  • And RDJ as Sherlock is a Michael Dudikoff as Han Solo kind of miscast, so I really hope this turd will flop.

    December’s Box Office Battle: Avatar Versus Sherlock Holmes | /Film

  • Maybe you should consider this before you flippantly deride a non-virgin bride or groom as "miscast" in their own religious ceremony.

    Living together, having a big wedding.

  • He then states a "miscast" Goldwyn "makes revenge for his daughter's violation look more gratuitously brutal than the crime."

    Fat Guys at the Movies

  • And for everybody 'miscast' in Batman & Robin, the whole movie is a farking joke.

    Original Signal - Transmitting Buzz

  • In any event, Johnson now claims there has been an effort to "miscast" his responses.

    Guarino

  • The biography gives a detailed account of the context: Lowell's public refusal of a White House invitation because of the Vietnam War, his resulting sense of being "burdened to write on the great theme, private, and almost 'global'" ” but his sense of being "miscast" in that role.

    Ian Hamilton

  • O my SSF, even today I still feel miscast in the play and not finding anything I want to do … except write my own peculiar brand of SF/F for no money and few rewards.

    Rumble Fish

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