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Examples

  • And manye of hem were in habite of Cristene men: but I trowe wel, that it weren of suche, that wenten in for covetyse of the thresoure, that was there, and hadden over moche feblenesse in feithe; so that hire hertes ne myghte not enduren in the beleve for drede.

    The Voyages and Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • And so seyn thei of the sonne; be cause that he chaungethe the tyme and zevethe hete and norisschethe alle thinges upon erthe; and for it is of so gret profite, thei knowe wel, that that myghte not be, but that God lovethe it more than ony other thing.

    The Voyages and Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • And whan he was thus chosen, he wolde assayen, zif he myghte trust in hem or non, and whether thei wolde ben obeyssant to him or non.

    The Voyages and Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • And he had also in his gardyn alle maner of foules and of bestes that ony man myghte thenke on, for to have pley or desport to beholde hem.

    The Voyages and Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • Cathay hathe gretly coveted that rubye; but he myghte never han it, for werre ne for no maner of godes.

    The Voyages and Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • And siththen hidrewards, myghte no knyghte se hire, but that he dyede anon.

    The Voyages and Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • And with inne tho walles he had the fairest gardyn, that ony man myghte beholde; and therein were trees berynge alle maner of frutes, that ony man cowde devyse; and there in were also alle maner vertuous herbes of gode smelle, and alle other herbes also, that beren faire floures.

    The Voyages and Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • Also the sone of a pore man woke that hauke, and wisshed that he myghte cheve wel, and to ben happy to merchandise.

    The Voyages and Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • And nouther manne, best, ne no thing that berethe lif in him, ne may not dyen in that see: and that hathe ben proved manye tymes, be men that han disserved to ben dede, that han ben cast there inne, and left there inne 3 dayes or 4, and thei ne myghte never dye ther inne: for it resceyvethe no thing with inne him, that berethe lif.

    The Voyages and Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • But upon that montayne, to gon up, this monk had gret desire; and so upon a day, he wente up: and whan he was upward the 3 part of the montayne, he was so wery, that he myghte no ferthere, and so he rested him, and felle o slepe; and whan he awook, he fonde him self lyggynge at the foot of the montayne.

    The Voyages and Travels of Sir John Mandeville

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