Definitions

Sorry, no definitions found.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • She knew the neegee waited in the deep part for you to come to them.

    The House at Sugar Beach

  • It was my third biggest fear, right next to the fear that one of them would get abducted by heartmen on the road to Sugar Beach, or my first fear, that I would get sucked into the lagoon by neegee.

    The House at Sugar Beach

  • She was the one who was always telling neegee stories and then she had the nerve to go into the deep part of the lagoon and learn to swim?

    The House at Sugar Beach

  • If I did get attacked by neegee or a heartman or a rogue, I now had someone who would protect me.

    The House at Sugar Beach

  • But I knew that the neegee wanted me that day, not Eunice, Vicky, or Marlene.

    The House at Sugar Beach

  • I squeezed my eyes shut in the dark, and hoped Eunice wasn’t going to tell a neegee story.

    The House at Sugar Beach

  • The Liberian in me—the part of me that believes in heartmen, neegee, witch doctors, and that we are all joined spiritually and that there’s no way my Daddy could die thousands of miles away from me without me somehow sensing it—still believes that my illness that day was Daddy’s way of saying good-bye to me.

    The House at Sugar Beach

  • If the neegee came after me over there, I wouldn’t get away.

    The House at Sugar Beach

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • “I grew up in a house 200 yards from the Atlantic just outside Monrovia, and we never went into the sea; we left that to the tourists. We were willing to venture into the many lagoons that collected near the country’s beaches, but there was no way we were going to brave the Atlantic, with its rough waves and fierce undertow. Not to mention the underwater neegees — or spirits — waiting to take you off to be eaten by sharks.”

    The New York Times, On Liberia’s Shore, Catching a New Wave , by Helene Cooper, January 24, 2010

    January 27, 2010