Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A cell that arises from a primordial germ cell and differentiates into an oocyte in the ovary.
  • n. A female reproductive structure in certain thallophytes, usually a rounded cell or sac containing one or more oospheres.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An immature ovarian egg within a developing fetus

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A special cell in certain cryptogamous plants containing oöspheres, as in the rockweeds (Fucus), and the orders Vaucherieæ and Peronosporeæ.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In botany, the female sexual organ in certain cryptogamic plants.
  • n. In zoology: The primordial mother-cell which gives rise to the ovum and its follicle.
  • n. One of the youngest ovarian cells, characterized by having in its nucleus the same number of chromosomes as in the nuclei of the somatic or body-cells. The oögonia, which eventually give rise to the primary oöcytes, are homologous in the oögenesis with the spermatogonia in the spermatogenesis of the male animal of the same species.

Etymologies

oo- + New Latin gonium, cell (from Greek gonos, seed; see gono-).
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

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  • ~ Primitive differentiated female gamete which gives rise to oocytes. Singular of oogonia.
    ~ An immature ovum. It is a female gametogonium.
    ~ Oogonia are formed in large numbers by mitosis early in fetal life from primordial germ cells, which are present in the fetus between weeks 4 and 8. Oogonia are present in the fetus between weeks 5 and 30.
    ~ Oogonia are also the female reproductive structures in certain thallophytes, and are usually rounded cells or sacs containing one or more oospheres.

    January 18, 2009