Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Greek Mythology Any of a group of mountain nymphs.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A mountain nymph. An anthropomorphic appearance of the spirit of a mountain.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One of the nymphs of mountains and grottoes.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In Greek myth, a mountain nymph.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. (Greek mythology) one of the mountain nymphs

Etymologies

Latin Orēas, Orēad-, from Greek Oreias, from oreios, of a mountain, from oros, mountain.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Greek (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • I care though. just so thats out in the open. .well not so open. nobodys oging to oread this and thast prolly for the best.

    katebell Diary Entry

  • Thereafter Jurgen came upon a considerable commotion in the bushes, where a satyr was at play with an oread.

    Jurgen A Comedy of Justice

  • We always remembered the picture she made there; and in later days when we read Tennyson's poems at a college desk, we knew exactly how an oread, peering through the green leaves on some haunted knoll of many fountained

    The Story Girl

  • As for him, he was not thinking of the mountain girl, the oread who, in the days when he was younger and his heart beat high, had caught his light fancy, tempting him from his comrades back to the cabin in the valley, to look again into her eyes and touch the brown waves of her hair.

    Audrey

  • He paused to survey the oread vision of Lady Kitty.

    The Marriage of William Ashe

  • Was she salamander or sylph, naiad or undine, oread or dryad?

    There & Back

  • She was a child of the whole world, as the naiad is the child of the river, and the oread of the mountain.

    There & Back

  • Tennyson calls “Maud” an _oread_, because her hall and garden were on a hill.

    Character Sketches of Romance, Fiction and the Drama A Revised American Edition of the Reader's Handbook, Vol. 3

  • Not for a moment could it be fancied the oread step which belonged to that daughter of the hills -- my wife, my Agnes; no, it was the dull massy tread of a man: and immediately there came a loud blow upon the door, and in the next moment, the bell having been found, a furious peal of ringing.

    The Uncollected Writings of Thomas de Quincey, Vol. 2 With a Preface and Annotations by James Hogg

  • Not for a moment could it be fancied the oread step which belonged to that daughter of the hills -- my wife, my Agnes; no, it was the dull massy tread of a man: and immediately there came a loud blow upon the door, and in the next moment, the bell having been found,

    Narrative and Miscellaneous Papers — Volume 1

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