Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A rope sling for rolling cylindrical objects up or down an inclined plane.
  • n. A sling for raising or lowering an object vertically.
  • transitive v. To raise or lower with such a sling.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A kind of purchase for hoisting or lowering a cylindrical burden, as a cask. The middle of a long rope is made fast aloft, and both parts are looped around the object, which rests in the loops, and rolls in them as the ends are hauled up or payed out.
  • n. A double sling made of a single rope, for slinging a cask, gun, etc.
  • v. To hoist or lower by means of a parbuckle

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A kind of purchase for hoisting or lowering a cylindrical burden, as a cask. The middle of a long rope is made fast aloft, and both parts are looped around the object, which rests in the loops, and rolls in them as the ends are hauled up or payed out.
  • n. A double sling made of a single rope, for slinging a cask, gun, etc.
  • transitive v. To hoist or lower by means of a parbuckle.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To hoist or lower by means of a parbuckle.
  • n. A device for raising or lowering a heavy body, as a cask, gun, etc., along an inclined plane or vertical surface.

Etymologies

Alteration (influenced by buckle) of parbunkel.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • After refitting, we went for a cruise to the East Indies, where we found the new admiral who had come out to replace Admiral Hope; and, in the spring of the following year, having served for eighteen months as a naval cadet, I was promoted to the rank of midshipman, the captain and first lieutenant, having convinced themselves of my competency by asking me how I would manage to get a six-pounder to the top of a perpendicular hill, my answer to which question was that I would head it up in a cask and "parbuckle" it up.

    Crown and Anchor Under the Pen'ant

  • "parbuckle" on board her spars lying alongside her in the stream, fit her rigging, bend her sails, stow her hold, and present her all a-taunt-o to the men who were to sail her.

    From Sail to Steam, Recollections of Naval Life

  • When the tree was cut off he hauled it to the surface with a long parbuckle chain to which Babe, mounted on snowshoes, was hitched.

    The Marvelous Exploits of Paul Bunyan

  • They'd left some gear behind them, but we were most of two days cutting and heaving the beast out with a parbuckle under him.

    Hawtrey's Deputy

  • Then, having got the first gun on deck -- already prepared in Port Royal dockyard, by being encased in a stout cylindrical packing of planks -- we passed the bights of our two hawsers round it, one at each end, and with all hands tailing on -- except one, whom we set to watch as a sentinel -- proceeded to parbuckle it up the face of the cliff.

    A Middy of the King A Romance of the Old British Navy

  • This gave me a good deal of trouble, for I wanted the spar on deck, not overboard; so I had to go to work to parbuckle it up the side, which I managed pretty well by watching the lift of the seas.

    A Pirate of the Caribbees

  • This formed a parbuckle, and when the men hauled upon the upper lengths of the ropes the cask easily rolled up to the ends of the lower lengths.

    By Conduct and Courage A Story of the Days of Nelson

  • "We must pass straps round this, and parbuckle him up," he observed.

    Adrift in a Boat

  • 'I've been looking at your men handling that gun, and my opinion is, that if you gets a butt, crams in a carronade, well woulded up, and fill it with old junk and rope yarns, you might parbuckle it up to the very top.'

    Peter Simple; and, The Three Cutters, Vol. 1-2

  • ` I've been looking at your men handling that gun, and my opinion is, that if you gets a butt, crams in a carronade, well woulded up, and fill it with old junk and rope yarns, you might parbuckle it up to the very top. '

    Peter Simple

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Comments

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  • "Parbuckle, is a contrivance to haul up, or lower down a cask, &c. where there is no crane or tackle.

    "It is formed by passing the middle of a rope round a post or ring, or under a boat's thwart; the two parts of the rope are then passed under the two quarters of the cask, bringing the two ends back again over it, which being both hauled or slackened together, either raise or lower the barrel, &c. as may be required."
    Falconer's New Universal Dictionary of the Marine (1816), 333

    October 14, 2008