Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The legume or pericarp, or the pod, of the pea.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The legume or pericarp, or the pod, of the pea.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. See peasecod.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • His flat soft ruff, composed of many layers of lace, hung over a thick blue satin doublet, slashed with rose-colored taffeta and embroidered with pearls, the front of which was brought to a point hanging over the front of his hose in what was known as a peascod shape.

    The Panchronicon

  • He has only his hedcosycasket on and his wollsey shirtplisse with peascod doublet, also his feet wear doubled width socks for he always must to insure warm sleep between a pair of fullyfleeced bankers like a finnoc in a cauwl.

    Finnegans Wake

  • Well, fare thee well: I have known thee these twenty-nine years, come peascod-time; but an honester and truer-hearted man, — well, fare thee well.

    The second part of King Henry the Fourth

  • He who has no romantic dreams at twenty-one will be a horribly dry peascod at fifty; therefore it is that I gaze reverently at all

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 17, No. 101, March, 1866

  • Bunches of grapes are frequently worked solidly, and even the popular peascod is worked in outline stitch, and often the petit point period lace stitches are copied, and roses and birds worked separately and after stitched to the design.

    Chats on Old Lace and Needlework

  • Kate's dainty thumb strips the row of peas out of a peascod.

    The Yeoman Adventurer

  • Not yet old enough for a man, nor young enough for a boy; as a squash is before ’tis a peascod, or a codling when ’tis almost an apple: ’tis with him in standing water, between boy and man.

    Act I. Scene V. Twelfth-Night; or, What You Will

  • Well, fare thee well: I have known thee these twenty-nine years, come peascod-time; but an honester, and truer-hearted man, —well, fare thee well.

    Act II. Scene IV. The Second Part of King Henry the Fourth

  • Tell them, Fool, that when the life and the mind are broken the truth comes through them like peas through a broken peascod.

    The Unicorn from the Stars and Other Plays

  • Tell them, Fool, that when the life and the mind are broken, the truth comes through them like peas through a broken peascod.

    The Hour Glass

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  • Go pipe at Pedley, there's a peascod feast - an old saying from Cheshire, England, spoken as reproof to those persons who made themselves extremely busy in trifles and matters that did not concern them. Recorded in Francis Grose's A Provincial Glossary.

    May 2, 2011

  • Lest we forget, a 1651 (recorded) English country dance entitled "Gathering Peascods" is still danced today to music historically associated with that particular dance.

    Cf. peasecod, pesecod, etc. - archaic words for the pod of the pea plant, pregnant at maturity, which were anciently used as a divination of love prospects.

    See also peascod wooing, and Peascod doublet.

    November 19, 2010