Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • In the very old days the "piskun" was used, and buffalo were enticed to follow a fantastically dressed man toward a cliff, far enough to get the herd moving in that direction, when the "buffalo-man" gained cover, and hidden Indians raised from their hiding places behind the animals, and drove them over the cliff, where they were killed in large numbers.

    Indian Why Stories

  • "piskun" was used, and buffalo were enticed to follow a fantastically dressed man toward a cliff, far enough to get the herd moving in that direction, when the "buffalo-man" gained cover, and hidden Indians raised from their hiding places behind the animals, and drove them over the cliff, where they were killed in large numbers.

    Indian Why Stories

  • The old woman called out to the son-in-law, saying, "Your father-in-law has already gone down to the piskun."

    Blackfeet Indian Stories

  • One day Old Man stood on a hill and looked over toward the piskun at

    Blackfeet Indian Stories

  • The young men kept going out, as they always did, to try to bring the buffalo to the edge of the cliff, but somehow they would not jump over into the piskun.

    Blackfeet Indian Stories

  • Kut-o-yis´ followed up the stream to where the piskun was and there found many lodges of people.

    Blackfeet Indian Stories

  • "Oh," she called out, "if you will only jump off into the piskun I will marry one of you."

    Blackfeet Indian Stories

  • When run into the piskun, the buffalo were really drawn by curiosity almost to the jumping point, and between two long diverging lines of people, who kept hidden until after the buffalo had passed them, and then rose and showed themselves and tried to frighten the animals.

    Blackfeet Indian Stories

  • A moment later a big bull jumped high over the wall of the piskun and came toward her, and now truly she was frightened.

    Blackfeet Indian Stories

  • This made him so angry that he wanted to do something, and he went down to the woman's piskun and began to break down its walls, so the chief of the women turned him into a pine-tree.

    Blackfeet Indian Stories

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