Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A planetree.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The plane tree.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. See platane.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. any of several trees of the genus Platanus having thin pale bark that scales off in small plates and lobed leaves and ball-shaped heads of fruits

Etymologies

From Latin platanus; later reborrowed from Middle French platane. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Nýja platan hennar, "Two Suns" er í nánast stöðugri spilun hjá mér þessa dagana.

    B-Town Hit Parade

  • Þeir eiga þessi hjörtu enn því nýja platan þeirra 'Voyager' hefur fengið fínar viðtökur síðan hún kom í heiminn í sumar.

    B-Town Hit Parade

  • "transcendental platan," breaking into foliage and flower at the summit of its smooth tall bole; the splendour of flame leaping from the dull fuel of gums and straw.

    Robert Browning

  • Spenser's art) 7 The warlike beech; the ash for nothing ill; warlike > (Because war-chariots in antiquity were reputedly made of beech) 8 The fruitful olive; and the platan round; platan > plane-tree

    The Faerie Queene — Volume 01

  • Hence his love of images which convey these sudden transformations, ” the worm, putting forth in autumn its “two wondrous winglets,” [110] the “transcendental platan,” breaking into foliage and flower at the summit of its smooth tall bole; the splendour of flame leaping from the dull fuel of gums and straw.

    Robert Browning

  • And what the effects and benefit of such plantations have produc’d, is conspicuous in one of the most celebrated cities of the East, the famous Ispahan, clear’d of the pestilence, since the surrounding it with that beautiful platan, as I have already noted.

    Sylva, Vol. 1 (of 2) Or A Discourse of Forest Trees

  • Under a platan i] The plane tree so named from the breadth of its leaves » a tree useful and delightful for its extraordinary shade, Virg.

    Paradise Lost: A Poem, in Twelve Books. The Author John Milton. Printed from the Text of Tonson ...

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