Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Leaning toward, in a moral sense; inclined; disposed; prone; as, women propense to holiness.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Leaning toward, in a moral sense; inclined; disposed; prone.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Leaning toward anything, in a moral sense; inclined; disposed, whether to good or evil; prone.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Nevertheless the fanatic lowlanders, propense to pillage and proselytizing, burned the Christian churches, massacred the infidels, and tortured the priests, until they provoked a blood feud of uncommon asperity.

    First footsteps in East Africa

  • And for the same reasons is it that women are so earnestly delighted with this kind of men, as being more propense by nature to pleasure and toys.

    In Praise of Folly

  • But his great abstinence of all was from Sleep, and strange it was that one of such a Fleshly and sanguine composition, could overwatch so many heavy propense inclinations to Rest.

    Characters from 17th Century Histories and Chronicles

  • For heads that are disposed unto Schism and complexionally propense to innovation, are naturally indisposed for a community, nor will be ever confined unto the order or oeconomy of one body; and therefore, when they separate from others, they knit but loosely among themselves; nor contented with a general breach or dichotomy with their Church do subdivide and mince themselves almost into Atoms.

    Religio Medici

  • Heads that are disposed unto schism, and complexionally propense to innovation, are naturally indisposed for a community, nor will be ever confined unto the order or economy of one body; and, therefore, when they separate from others, they knit but loosely among themselves; nor contented with a general breach or dichotomy with their church, do subdivide and mince themselves almost into atoms.

    The World's Greatest Books — Volume 13 — Religion and Philosophy

  • Not that the doctor was a bully, or even pugnacious, in the usual sense of the word; he had no disposition to provoke a fight, no propense love of quarrelling; but there was that in him which would allow him to yield to no attack.

    Doctor Thorne

  • These are two extremes which men are very propense to run into, either into the one or the other of them.

    The Whole Works of the Rev. John Howe, M.A. with a Memoir of the Author. Vol. VI.

  • If one be found to have killed another, the great thing inquired into, is the inclination indulged, the intention; whether or no it was through malice propense.

    The Whole Works of the Rev. John Howe, M.A. with a Memoir of the Author. Vol. VI.

  • A man then is to be esteemed a lover of God, according as his heart stands habitually propense to him.

    The Whole Works of the Rev. John Howe, M.A. with a Memoir of the Author. Vol. VI.

  • But high priests' servants are propense to follow the swaggering gait of their masters, and to carry things with a high hand, in such wise as to excite the choler of the most quiet.

    Imaginary Conversations and Poems A Selection

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