Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The state or character of being ravenous; furious avidity; rage for prey.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. excessive desire to eat

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • His ravenousness reminds us of this species which some bright person brought to our country to promote fish farming, and which is now a pest in our rivers and lakes.

    Yoani Sanchez: The Fish That Is Eating Cuba

  • Then it occurred to me that I have not yet savoured the taste of borshch-as-imagined-by-Lisa, despite my repeated expressions of salivation and ravenousness.

    Archive 2007-09-01

  • I started to pour some into a cereal bowl, but in my current state of ravenousness, a cereal bowl looked roughly the size of a thimble.

    Duma Key

  • For those of us who dash into Queretaro for the "big box" run at Costco, Home Depot etc., we are often faced with both weariness and ravenousness, so we head to whatever is handy.

    Great food in Queretaro

  • Thinking with their penis – not for sex – as they rampage the Universe while bowing at the phallic altar of ravenousness.

    May I be skeptical?

  • But whence is it that a certain ravenousness and frenzy drives you in these happy days to pollute yourselves with blood, since you have such an abundance of things necessary for your subsistence?

    Essays and Miscellanies

  • The mate with difficulty restrained them in their ravenousness.

    Robur the Conqueror

  • But the reckoning finally settled down to four, and people would converse learnedly though only about half-seriously about the “attributes” and “tendencies” of different kinds of matter: the impetuosity, ravenousness, and light-contributing nature of Fire, the malleability and passiveness of Water, and so forth.

    Rihannsu: The Bloodwing Voyages

  • But the reckoning finally settled down to four, and people would converse learnedly though only about half-seriously about the "attributes" and "tendencies" of different kinds of matter; the impetuosity, ravenousness, and light-contributing nature of Fire, the malleability and passiveness of Water, and so forth.

    The Romulan Way

  • Of the ravenousness of wolves among the Jews, take these two examples besides others.

    From the Talmud and Hebraica

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