Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The doctrine of propositions or sentences.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Having a verb for its base; derived from a verb.
  • n. The doctrine of propositions or sentences.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Pertaining to or derived from a verb.
  • n. The doctrine of propositions or sentences.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Signs are rhematic signs (also called “sumisigns” and “rhemes”), dicisigns (also called “quasi-propositions”), or arguments (also called “suadisigns”), accordingly as they are predicational/relational in character, propositional in character, or argumentative in character.

    Nobody Knows Nothing

  • These ten types of sign are simply called after the combination of their elements: an ordinary proposition is a dicentic-symbolic-legisign, a spontaneous cry a rhematic-indexical-sinsign, and so on.

    Peirce's Theory of Signs

  • A fourth term is wanting, the rhematic, or logic of sentences.

    Specimens of the Table Talk of Samuel Taylor Coleridge

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Comments

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  • –adjective
    1. pertaining to the formation of words.
    2. pertaining to the rheme of a sentence.

    May 29, 2009