Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A sheltered offshore anchorage area for ships.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A partly-sheltered anchorage outside a harbour.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. An anchorage off shore. Same as road, 4.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Same as road, 5.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a partly sheltered anchorage

Etymologies

Variant of rodestead : rode2 + sted, place (variant of stead).
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • We were all that afternoon and night, and part of the following day, descending the main channel of the Volga, and it was past noon before we reached the Nine Feet Station, for so they call the roadstead above which vessels of more than nine feet draught dare not venture.

    Russia As Seen and Described by Famous Writers

  • "What he call roadstead?" interrupted the negro, seizing at once, with the avidity of ignorance, on the little oversight of his adversary, in confounding the outer harbour of Newport with the wilder anchorage below, and with the usual indifference of all similar people to the more material matter of whether the objection was at all germain to the point in controversy; "I never hear 'em call anchoring ground, with land around it, roadstead afore!"

    The Red Rover

  • Sixteen years ago the hire of a boat from the harbour to the roadstead was a piastre and a half: now it is at least five.

    Personal Narrative of a Pilgrimage to Al-Madinah and Meccah

  • Only vessels of light draft can enter; large vessels anchor in the roadstead, which is the channel between Yloilo harbour and Guimarás Island.

    The Philippine Islands

  • Meanwhile Linois had taken refuge in the tiny curve of the Spanish coast known as the roadstead of Algeciras.

    Deeds that Won the Empire Historic Battle Scenes

  • The anchorage was excellent, so far as the bottom was concerned, but it could scarcely be called a roadstead in any other point of view, since there was shelter against no wind but that which blew directly off shore, which happened to be a wind that did not prevail in that part of the island.

    The Two Admirals

  • Jim looked every day over the thickets of gardens, beyond the roofs of the town, over the fronds of palms growing on the shore, at that roadstead which is a thoroughfare to the East, -- at the roadstead dotted by garlanded islets, lighted by festal sunshine, its ships like toys, its brilliant activity resembling

    Lord Jim

  • Jim looked every day over the thickets of gardens, beyond the roofs of the town, over the fronds of palms growing on the shore, at that roadstead which is a thoroughfare to the East, — at the roadstead dotted by garlanded islets, lighted by festal sunshine, its ships like toys, its brilliant activity resembling a holiday pageant, with the eternal serenity of the Eastern sky overhead and the smiling peace of the Eastern seas possessing the space as far as the horizon.

    Lord Jim

  • Jim looked every day over the thickets of gardens, beyond the roofs of the town, over the fronds of palms growing on the shore, at that roadstead which is a thoroughfare to the East, -- at the roadstead dotted by garlanded islets, lighted by festal sunshine, its ships like toys, its brilliant activity resembling a holiday pageant, with the eternal serenity of the Eastern sky overhead and the smiling peace of the Eastern seas possessing the space as far as the horizon.

    Lord Jim

  • The third battlewagon, Haruna, was anchored in the roadstead.

    Whirlwind

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