Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Of, relating to, or consisting of flesh or muscle tissue.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. fleshy; applied to the minute structural elements that make up muscle fibre

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Fleshy; -- applied to the minute structural elements, called sarcous elements, or sarcous disks, of which striated muscular fiber is composed.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Fleshy; sarcodous: especially noting the contractile tissue of muscles: as, sarcous elements, the form-elements of muscular tissue.

Etymologies

From Ancient Greek flesh. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • When, on the other hand, the fiber is extended, this clear substance is driven out of the tubes and collects between the sarcous element and the membrane of Krause, and gives the appearance of the light part between these two structures; by this means it elongates and narrows the sarcomere.

    IV. Myology. 2. Development of the Muscles

  • The sarcomere is situated between two membranes of Krause and consists of (1) a central dark part, which forms a portion of the dark band of the whole fiber, and is named a sarcous element.

    IV. Myology. 2. Development of the Muscles

  • This sarcous element really consists of two parts, superimposed one on the top of the other, and when the fiber is stretched these two parts become separated from each other at the line of Hensen (Fig. 376, A).

    IV. Myology. 2. Development of the Muscles

  • The sarcous element does not lie free in the sarcomere, for when the sarcostyle is stretched, so as to render the clear portion visible, very fine lines, which are probably septa, may be seen running through it from the sarcous element to the membrane of Krause.

    IV. Myology. 2. Development of the Muscles

  • When the sarcostyle is stretched to its full extent, not only is the clear portion well-marked, but the dark portion—the sarcous element—is separated into its two constituents along the line of Hensen.

    IV. Myology. 2. Development of the Muscles

  • Schäfer explains these phenomena in the following way: He considers that each sarcous element is made up of a number of longitudinal channels, which open into the clear part toward the membrane of Krause but are closed at the line of Hensen.

    IV. Myology. 2. Development of the Muscles

  • When the muscular fiber is contracted the clear part of the muscular substance is driven into these channels or tubes, and is therefore hidden from sight, but at the same time it swells up the sarcous element and widens and shortens the sarcomere.

    IV. Myology. 2. Development of the Muscles

  • In muscle there is the same thing, viz., a framework of spongioplasm staining with hematoxylin—the substance of the sarcous element—and this encloses a clear hyaloplasm, the clear substance of the sarcomere, which resists staining with this reagent.

    IV. Myology. 2. Development of the Muscles

  • In this way the contraction is brought about: under stimulation the protoplasmic material (the clear substance of the sarcomere) recedes into the sarcous element, causing the sarcomere to widen out and shorten.

    IV. Myology. 2. Development of the Muscles

  • On two nothing could be seen but little masses of transparent viscid fluid; but when these were examined under a high power, fat-globules, bits of fibro-elastic tissue, and some few parallelograms of sarcous matter, could be distinguished, but not a vestige of transverse striae.

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