Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The part of the brain that receives and coordinates all the stimuli conveyed to various sensory centers.
  • n. The entire sensory system of the body.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. All the sensory apparatus of an organism
  • n. The central part of a nervous system that receives and coordinates all stimuli

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The seat of sensation; the nervous center or centers to which impressions from the external world must be conveyed before they can be perceived; the place where external impressions are localized, and transformed into sensations, prior to being reflected to other parts of the organism; hence, the whole nervous system, when animated, so far as it is susceptible of common or special sensations.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A supposed point in or part of the brain where sensation resides or becomes manifest; the so-called “seat of the soul”; hence, the undetermined part of the nervous system in which molecular activity of certain kinds and certain grades of intensity immediately causes sensation; loosely, the brain, or the brain and spinal cord; especially, the gray matter of these organs, or any nervous ganglion regarded as a center of sensation. Also sensory, sensitory.
  • n. In biology, the whole sensory apparatus of the body, or physical mechanism of sensation, including the skin and entire nervous system as well as the special sense-organs; all the parts, organs, and tissues of the body which are capable of receiving or transmitting impressions from without.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the areas of the brain that process and register incoming sensory information and make possible the conscious awareness of the world

Etymologies

Late Latin sēnsōrium, organ of sensation, from Latin sēnsus, sense; see sense.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • The word sensorium is used to express not only the medullary part of the brain, spinal marrow, nerves, organs of sense and muscles, but also at the same time that living principle, or spirit of animation, which resides throughout the body, without being cognizable to our senses except by its effects. additional notes contents table of contents

    Note II

  • The word sensorium is used to express not only the medullary part of the brain, spinal marrow, nerves, organs of sense and muscles, but also at the same time that living principle, or spirit of animation, which resides throughout the body, without being cognizable to our senses except by its effects.

    The Temple of Nature; or, the Origin of Society A Poem, with Philosophical Notes

  • That exertion or change of the sensorium, which is caused by the appulses of external bodies, either simply subsides, or is succeeded by sensation, or it produces fibrous motions; it is termed irritation, and irritative motions are those contractions of the muscular fibres, or of the organs of sense, that are immediately consequent to this exertion or change of the sensorium.

    Zoonomia, Vol. I Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • These sensitive, impression-receiving ends constitute together what is called the "sensorium" of the body.

    Applied Psychology: Making Your Own World Being the Second of a Series of Twelve Volumes on the Applications of Psychology to the Problems of Personal and Business Efficiency

  • If it is the fact that a certain quantity of phosphorus is expended in the work of the brain, it would be difficult to say how many milligrammes the judge had parted with to excite the network of his "sensorium," and after all, to find out nothing, absolutely nothing.

    Eight Hundred Leagues on the Amazon

  • That no one is any longer made accountable, that the kind of being manifested cannot be traced back to a causa prima, that the world is a unity neither as sensorium nor as ‘spirit’, this alone is the great liberation.

    Nietzsche the Pantheist? | Heretical Ideas Magazine

  • But I did have a period in which for about two weeks, when I actually wasn't taking anything, when something seemed to happen to my sensorium.

    Oliver Sacks: A Neurologist Examines 'The Mind's Eye'

  • Its most resonant claim is that the sound of sound becomes the medium of conversation with the sensorium of the external world, not only its nonsemantic noises, but its auditorium of other voices, especially poets '.

    Article Abstracts

  • He hit the Simstim and flipped into her sensorium.

    Wonder Woman and the Lasso of Truth

  • Keying back into her sensorium, into the sinuous flow of muscle, senses sharp and bright.

    Wonder Woman and the Lasso of Truth

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