Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Then loud arguing started again, and then I could slooshy the slovo Love being thrown around, the prison charles himself creeching as loud as any about Perfect Love Casteth Out Fear and all that cal.

    Where's the show?

  • I could slooshy titters and a couple of real horrorshow hawhawhaws coming from like the audience.

    Where's the show?

  • We waited panting, and we could slooshy the sirening millicents going east, so we knew we were all right now.

    Where's the show?

  • You could hear some of the plennies in their cells cursing and singing and I fancied I could slooshy one belting out:

    Where's the show?

  • When I woke up I could hear slooshy music coming out of the wall, real gromky, and it was that that had dragged me out of my bit of like sleep.

    Where's the show?

  • I told Dim to lay off a bit then, because it used to interest me sometimes to slooshy what some of these starry decreps had to say about life and the world.

    Where's the show?

  • I knocked nice and gentle and nobody came, so I knocked a bit more and this time I could slooshy some - body coming, then a bolt drawn, then the door inched open an inch or so, then I could viddy this one glazz looking out at me and the door was on a chain.

    Where's the show?

  • Then he flick - flickflicked with his bolshy horny nail at my nose again, and I could slooshy very loud smecks of like mirth coming from the dark audience.

    Where's the show?

  • Then I could slooshy voices saying Right right right from like a distance, then nearer to, then there was a quiet like humming shoom as though things had been switched on.

    Where's the show?

  • But there were the golosses of millicents telling them to shut it and you could even slooshy the zvook of like somebody being tolchocked real horrorshow and going owwwwwwwww, and it was like the goloss of a drunken starry ptitsa, not a man.

    Where's the show?

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  • "To listen, hear" (Russian origin)in Nadsat (literary lingo from A Clockwork orange).

    January 7, 2009