Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To put to sleep; to quiet.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To lay asleep; to put to sleep; to quiet.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To put to sleep; set at rest; quiet; silence; specifically, in Scots law, to quash.

Etymologies

Latin sopitus, past participle of sopire ("to put to sleep"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • He urged that the quarrel was common to them, and that Balmawhapple could not, by the code of honour, _vite_ giving satisfaction to both, which he had done in his case by an honourable meeting, and in that of Edward by such a palinode as rendered the use of the sword unnecessary, and which, being made and accepted, must necessarily sopite the whole affair.

    The Waverley

  • He urged that the quarrel was common to them, and that Balmawhapple could not, by the code of honour, evite giving satisfaction to both, which he had done in his case by an honourable meeting, and in that of Edward by such a palinode as rendered the use of the sword unnecessary, and which, being made and accepted, must necessarily sopite the whole affair.

    Waverley — Volume 1

  • He began to bethink himself, “That if Ravenswood was to have a distinguished place of power and trust, and if such a union would sopite the heavier part of his unadjusted claims, there might be worse matches for his daughter Lucy: the Master might be reponed against the attainder.

    The Bride of Lammermoor

  • "That if Ravenswood was to have a distinguished place of power and trust, and if such a union would sopite the heavier part of his unadjusted claims, there might be worse matches for his daughter Lucy: the Master might be reponed against the attainder.

    The Bride of Lammermoor

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