Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A man, especially a soldier, armed with a spear.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A soldier who fights with a spear

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One who is armed with a spear.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. One who uses or is armed with a spear; especially, a soldier whose spear is his principal weapon. Compare lancer, lansquenet, pikeman.
  • n. A book-name for any leaf-beetle of the genus Doryphora. The Colorado potato-beetle, Dutch decemlineata. is the ten-lined spearman. See cut under beetle.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Cannot compute exact p-values with ties in: cor.test.defaultYear, Hc, method = "spearman"

    Paul Linsay's Poisson Fit « Climate Audit

  • An over-arm spearman has to wait for his moment and then commit himself.

    The Spear « Isegoria

  • Worse still, the spearman thrusting over-arm will of necessity expose himself as he does this, leaning forwards out of formation, and turning his shield to the left to give himself room for the thrust.

    The Spear « Isegoria

  • If an enemy spearman to the right of the over-arm user saw the thrust coming, he would have an easy victim: a man who has stepped with his weight onto his front foot (thus preventing any evasion by footwork) with an exposed shieldless side.

    The Spear « Isegoria

  • The front end of the spear would act as a lever, twisting the wrist of the spearman, and the swinging rear counter-weight end would act to exaggerate this effect.

    The Spear « Isegoria

  • With the under-arm grip, a spearman can thrust with his spear downwards at the feet of his foe, or upward at his face.

    The Spear « Isegoria

  • To close with a spearman, a sword user has to knock the spearhead aside and rush in at his foe.

    The Spear « Isegoria

  • With an under-arm grip, the spearman has his spear braced along his forearm, and has much more control of the spearhead.

    The Spear « Isegoria

  • When on the march or standing at rest, a spear would be held vertically, and the spearman simply has to lower the spear into position, and thrust it out in front of him.

    The Spear « Isegoria

  • Anyone standing behind an over-arm spearman will be faced with a butt-spike going in and out at every thrust, and unpredictably sideways whenever an enemy knocks the spearhead.

    The Spear « Isegoria

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