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Examples

  • The galeasse was the connecting link between the navy of oars and the navy of sails.

    Sea-Wolves of the Mediterranean

  • The description of a galeasse of nearly one thousand tons burden is set forth as follows by

    Sea-Wolves of the Mediterranean

  • In a later chapter an attempt has been made to place before the reader pictures of the galley, the galeasse, and the nef, which were the names attached to the ships then in use; the name brigantine, far from having the significance attached to it by the sailor of the present day, seems to have been a generic term to denote any craft not included in the names already given.

    Sea-Wolves of the Mediterranean

  • There were, in addition to the galley, the nef and the galeasse; the former of these was a sailing vessel pure and simple like those remarkable caravels in which Columbus discovered America.

    Sea-Wolves of the Mediterranean

  • At dead of night Dragut assembled his forces, and before morning every galley, galeasse, and brigantine had been dragged across the island and launched in the sea on the opposite side.

    Sea-Wolves of the Mediterranean

  • The galeasse was really a magnified galley, one which used both sails and oars, on board of which the rowers were under cover; she was built with a forecastle and a sterncastle which were elevated some six feet above the benches of the rowers, and her very long and immensely heavy oars were of course proportionate to the size of the vessel.

    Sea-Wolves of the Mediterranean

  • It was from the nef and the galeasse that the sailing man-of-war arrived by the process of evolution.

    Sea-Wolves of the Mediterranean

  • Yet how was he to succeed, now, since Asad was aboard the galeasse?

    The Sea-Hawk

  • Then as the shrill whistle of the boatswain rang out and the whips of his mates went hissing and cracking about the shoulders of the already half-awakened slaves, to mingle with all the rest of the stir and bustle aboard the galeasse, the

    The Sea-Hawk

  • He was chained, like the rest, stark naked, save for a loincloth, in the place nearest the gangway on the first starboard bench abaft the narrow waist-deck, and ere the galeasse had made the short distance between the mole and the island at the end of it, the boatswain's whip had coiled itself about his white shoulders to urge him to better exertion than he was putting forth.

    The Sea-Hawk

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