Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Very drunk, as if brought to the level of a swine by intoxication.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • ‘Drunkenness is his best virtue; for he will be swine-drunk.’

    Ballads of Romance and Chivalry Popular Ballads of the Olden Times - First Series

  • He will lie, Sir, with such volubility, that you would think truth were a fool: drunkenness is his best virtue; for he will be swine-drunk; and in his sleep he does little harm.

    Frank Mildmay Or, The Naval Officer

  • He will steal, sir, an egg out of a cloister; for rapes and ravishments he parallels Nessus; he professes not keeping of oaths; in breaking ’em he is stronger than Hercules; he will lie, sir, with such volubility, that you would think truth were a fool; drunkenness is his best virtue, for he will be swine-drunk, and in his sleep he does little harm, save to his bed-clothes about him; but they know his conditions, and lay him in straw.

    Act IV. Scene III. All’s Well that Ends Well

  • He will steal, sir, an egg out of a cloister: for rapes and ravishments he parallels Nessus: he professes not keeping of oaths; in breaking 'em he is stronger than Hercules: he will lie, sir, with such volubility, that you would think truth were a fool: drunkenness is his best virtue, for he will be swine-drunk; and in his sleep he does little harm, save to his bed-clothes about him; but they know his conditions and lay him in straw.

    All's Well That Ends Well

  • a fool: drunkenness is his best virtue, for he will be swine-drunk, and in his sleep he does little harm.

    Frank Mildmay The Naval Officer

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