Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A sunken vat in which hides are laid in tan.
  • n. A bark-bed.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I imagine a good tanner might in this colony tan the leather of the country, and cheaper than in France; I even imagine that the leather might there be brought to its perfection in less time; and what makes me think so, is, that I have heard it averred, that the Spanish leather is extremely good, and is never above three or four months in the tan-pit.

    History of Louisisana Or of the Western Parts of Virginia and Carolina: Containing

  • "And choked in thy vile tan-pit, for scurvier song was never heard, par Dex!"

    The Geste of Duke Jocelyn

  • The cane was all gone, certainly, but had been replaced with green-hide seats (not green in colour, of course, only green in experience, never having seen a tan-pit).

    We of the Never-Never

  • The rest hour was over and Constans's place was at the tan-pit.

    The Doomsman

  • One was too far off, and looked into a tan-pit; another was too much in the middle of the town, next door to a machine-shop.

    The Peterkin Papers

  • Ah, if the bark-mill, and the old mule, and the tan-pit, and the wood-pile, and the cornfield might testify!

    Down the Ravine

  • One was too far off, and looked into a tan-pit, another was too much in the middle of the town, next door to

    St. Nicholas Magazine for Boys and Girls, Vol. 5, May, 1878, No. 7. Scribner's Illustrated

  • Now and then he was met by a strong scent, as of burning leather, from the oak-bark which some of the housewives used for fuel, after its essence had been exhausted in the tan-pit, but mostly the air was filled with the odour of burning peat.

    Warlock o' Glenwarlock

  • One was too far off, and looked into a tan-pit; another was too much in the middle of the town, next door to

    The Peterkin Papers

  • Young plants are sometimes grown without pots in propagating-pits; from which they are transferred, after being repotted, to what are called succession pits; and, after remaining there a long time, they are either removed to the tan-pit in the vinery to fruit, or to fruiting-pits.

    The Lady's Country Companion: or, How to Enjoy a Country Life Rationally

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Comments

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  • Now called a *tanning bed*? - "A sunken vat in which hides are laid to tan."

    December 11, 2010