Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Obsolete spelling of tear.
  • v. Obsolete spelling of tear.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Count hearing these contemptible wordes, was not a little greeved thereat; and although his courage was greater then his poore condition would permit him to expresse; yet, clouding all injuries with noble patience, hanging downe his head, and shedding many a salt teare, endured this reproach, as hee had done many, both before and after.

    The Decameron

  • I know no reason to the contrary, why I should not yet teare her in

    The Decameron

  • Guiscardo already was a dead man in Law, and death was likewise welcome to her, rather then the deprivation of her Love; and therefore, not like a weeping woman, or as checkt by the offence committed, but carelesse of any harme happening to her: stoutely and couragiously, not a teare appearing in her eye, or her soule any way to be perturbed, thus she spake to her Father.

    The Decameron

  • With which words, she hung downe her bead in her bosome, cunningly dissembling, as if shee wept, wiping her eyes with her Handkerchife, when not a teare fel from them, but indeed were dry enough.

    The Decameron

  • And for this cause, like spies you watch him, threaten him daily, as if you intended to teare him in pieces.

    The Decameron

  • What if they pul out mine eies, teare out my teeth, cut off my hands, or do me any other mischiefe: Where am I then?

    The Decameron

  • Tree halfe burned, lying flat on her face, naked, scorched and strangely deformed: shee beganne to teare the lockes of her owne hayre, raving and raging in as pittifull manner, as if her Ladie had beene quite dead.

    The Decameron

  • Neither I, nor any honest man else, ought to have any pity on her, but (with our owne hands) teare her in peeces, or dragge her along to a good fire in the Market place, wherein she and her minion should be consumed together, and their base ashes dispersed abroad in the winde, least the pure Aire should be infected with them.

    The Decameron

  • I enjoyned, therewith to open her accursed body, and teare out her hard and frozen heart, with her other inwards, as now thou seest me doe, which I give unto my Hounds to feede on.

    The Decameron

  • And because thou mightest the more freely enjoy them, see how my mercilesse Father (on his owne meere motion) hath sent thee to me; and truly I will bestow them frankly on thee, though once I had resolved, to die with drie eyes, and not shedding one teare, dreadlesse of their utmost malice towards me.

    The Decameron

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