Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Separation of the parts of a compound word by one or more intervening words; for example, where I go ever instead of wherever I go.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The insertion of one or more words between the components of a compound word.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The separation of the parts of a compound word by the intervention of one or more words.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In grammar, a figure by which a compound word is separated into two parts, and one or more words are inserted between them: as, “of whom be thou ware also” (2 Tim. iv. 15), for “of whom beware thou also.” Also called diacope.

Etymologies

Late Latin tmēsis, from Greek, a cutting, from temnein, to cut; see tem- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Coined 1586, from Late Latin tmēsis, from Ancient Greek τμῆσις (tmēsis, "a cutting"), from τέμνω (temnō, "I cut"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

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Comments

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  • JM hates tme-bloody-sis.

    March 24, 2011

  • "You can always tell a cuckoo from Bridge End .... it goes cuck-BLOODY-OO, cuck-BLOODY-OO, cuck-BLOODY-OO."

    Dylan Thomas, Portrait of the Artist as a Young Dog

    November 20, 2008

  • Does supercalifreakinawesome work?

    August 18, 2008

  • Come on. Tfuckingmesis.

    August 17, 2008

  • Infuckingcredible!

    August 17, 2008

  • Fanfuckingtastic is my fave.

    October 5, 2007

  • Or unfuckinbelievable.

    October 5, 2007

  • When we were kids and were told to behave, we'd reply with, "But I am being hayve!" ;-)

    October 3, 2007

  • How about "abso freakin' lutely?"

    See also dystmesis.

    October 3, 2007

  • Separation of the parts of a compound word by one or more intervening words; for example, "where I go ever" instead of "wherever I go".

    April 7, 2007

  • "West By God Virginia" is the one my father used to say.

    March 8, 2007