Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A familiar name for a dog.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. See touser.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Hi towser, the hairy man as in that scene from the 40 year old virgin?

    At My Table

  • Now I held king and queen, being three — a natural towser, making fifteen — and tiddy, nineteen.

    The Fortunes of Nigel

  • Her mouth was rose-red and tolerable small, but always ready for a smile, and she was a slim, active creature, a towser for work, yet full of the joy of life and ready enough for a mite of pleasure if it came her way.

    The Torch and Other Tales

  • Then he starts hauling and mauling and talking to him in Irish and the old towser growling, letting on to answer, like a duet in the opera.

    Ulysses

  • Eh? And with that he took the bloody old towser by the scruff of the neck and, by Jesus, he near throttled him.

    Ulysses

  • Cruelty afflicts poor towser with hunger, overworks the gentle horse and severely goads the patient

    An Apology for African Methodism

  • Now I held king and queen, being three -- a natural towser, making fifteen -- and tiddy, nineteen.

    The Fortunes of Nigel

  • Koala Bear: towser, interesting article and somewhat surprised that Japan have put a target deadline to win the 2050 World Cup ..

    The Roar - Your Sports Opinion

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Comments

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  • A coarse apron worn by maid-servants in working. - an old provincial term from Devonshire, recorded in Grose's 1787 A Provincial Glossary.

    May 3, 2011

  • OED: towser, -zer v. trans. (nonce-wd.), to worry as a dog does.

    c1680 Hickeringill Hist. Whiggism i. Wks. 1716 I. 37 If they get a piece of a Text by the end..they do so tear it, and towze it, and towzer it..that they lose themselves.

    October 28, 2007

  • "And with that he took the bloody old towser by the scruff of the neck and, by Jesus, he near throttled him."
    Joyce, Ulysses, 12

    January 13, 2007