Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The quality of having three independent channels for conveying color information in the eye.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the normal ability to see colors

Etymologies

tri- + Ancient Greek χρῶμα (khroma, "color"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The example provided by the uses of trichromacy is thus also an excellent model — within this larger object, color — of eighteenth-century interaction between practice and theory.

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • This property of human vision, called trichromacy, arises because the retina the layer of nerve cells in the eye that captures light and transmits visual information to the brain uses only three types of light-absorbing pigments for color vision.

    Scientific American

  • It is called trichromacy, because it depends on three types of light - activated pigments in the retina of the eye.

    Scientific American

  • This is the physiological basis for what is called “trichromacy,” that is, the three-color basis for human color vision.

    In the Valley of the Shadow

  • In this determination to refine the practical details of trichromacy, Quemiset's work is again typical.

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • The result casts some typical ideas of his time, notably the emphasis on trichromacy and the description of vision, into a new vocabulary without accompanying conceptual changes.

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • Practical realities underlying the ideal of trichromacy and the creation of black and white limited the use of practices in the explanation of theories.

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • Some eighteenth-century recipes to create black for textiles call for successive dyeings in blue, red, and yellow baths. 13 One rationale for the habit should be obvious; the choice of these three colors creates a link to the concept of trichromacy, but the economic implications of the recommendation are considerably more complicated.

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • He used specific painting and engraving techniques to prepare three plates according to doctrines of trichromacy that were proved by Newton and supported more generally by mechanical philosophy.

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • Le Blon's woven-picture industry would call on the same principles as did his picture-printing — blending primary colors — and give to tapestry the notion of color-mixing that was prominent in the idea of trichromacy.

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

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