Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A magical creature that attains corporeal reality, having been originally merely imaginary.
  • n. A modern type of imaginary friend inspired by traditional tulpa.

Etymologies

From Tibetan (Wylie transliteration: sprul-pa), equivalent to Sanskrit निर्मित (nirmita, "build") or निर्माण (nirmāṇa, "build") (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • It's also known that one of the projects assigned to rinpoches-in-trainig in Tibetan Buddhism is to create a tulpa which is "solid" enough to be perceived by other people.

    Posthuman Blues

  • In a lighter vein, there's even a wonderful Dr. Seuss treatment of the subject, in which a brother and sister home alone, of course create a kind of tulpa called a "Glunk" which they then can't get rid of.

    Posthuman Blues

  • That you had been able to be with him before his death and create a tulpa.

    The Dragon’s Apprentice

  • He would not have become a tulpa, and as we discovered, painting a portrait does not work on Fictions.

    The Dragon’s Apprentice

  • Jonathan Swift would occasionally join them, as would Rudyard Kipling, who, like Verne, was not a resident of the gallery but a tulpa—a younger, virtually immortal version of himself.

    The Dragon’s Apprentice

  • A tulpa can only be maintained by a deliberate act of will—and when he was certain it could be done, Charles switched his attention to his own.

    The Dragon’s Apprentice

  • “None of which would have been an issue if Stellan had been a tulpa,” he said, not really enjoying the admission.

    The Dragon’s Apprentice

  • But a tulpa of anyone else, be it a manservant or a colleague, would simply have to be ignored to make it fade back into the ether.

    The Dragon’s Apprentice

  • It was Dee, and then Blake, who realized that by making a tulpa of oneself, the consciousness, the soul, if you will—

    The Dragon’s Apprentice

  • “As we saw with Defoe, a tulpa body can still be destroyed.”

    The Dragon’s Apprentice

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Comments

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  • a Buddhist concept--materialized thought

    November 20, 2007