Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Not hurtful; wanting the power of doing harm or injury.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • What a nest of vipers may be crushed at once, or, at least, rendered unhurtful, by depriving the three monsters he names of the aid of such an agent?

    Sir Charles Grandison

  • Whatever the cause, it was clear that Oscar was what Shakespeare called himself, “an unhurtful opposite.”

    Oscar Wilde

  • O! you hope the duke will return no more, or you imagine me too unhurtful an opposite.

    Act III. Scene II. Measure for Measure

  • Whatever the cause, it was clear that Oscar was what Shakespeare called himself, "an unhurtful opposite."

    Oscar Wilde His Life and Confessions

  • But this unhurtful and harmless kind of worship pleaseth them.

    The Second Book. Of the Religions in Utopia

  • He comes nearer the fact in “Measure for Measure,” where the Duke, his other self, is shown to be “an unhurtful opposite” too gentle-kind to remember an injury or punish the offender, and he rings the bell at truth's centre when, in

    The Man Shakespeare

  • His humor is fast-paced and sophisticated, yet gentle and unhurtful: all in all, a charming and affable comedian.

    Sierra Sun - Top Stories

  • O, you hope the duke will return no more; or you imagine me too unhurtful an opposite.

    Measure for Measure

  • _ O, you hope the Duke will return no more; or 155 you imagine me too unhurtful an opposite.

    Measure for Measure The Works of William Shakespeare [Cambridge Edition] [9 vols.]

  • The $33,000 Mitsubishi iMievs are guaranteed unhurtful to polar bears (since electricity is generated from pixie dust) and can go 100 miles on a charge - but only with the lights off.

    Moonbattery

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  • O! you hope the duke will return no more, or you imagine me too unhurtful an opposite. But, indeed, I can do you little harm: you'll forswear this again.
    --William Shakespeare, 1603, Measure for Measure

    October 4, 2008